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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-03165

The massive Llao Rock lava flow, exposed in the NW wall of Crater Lake caldera, was emplaced at the end of a major eruption about 200 years prior to the formation of the caldera. The thin, light-colored unit at the base of the lava flow, seen prominently on the right, is a Plinian pumice deposit from that major explosive eruption. The lava flow is more than 350 m thick and is overlain by tephra from the caldera-forming eruption of Crater Lake. Photo by Lee Siebert, 1981 (Smithsonian Institution).

The massive Llao Rock lava flow, exposed in the NW wall of Crater Lake caldera, was emplaced at the end of a major eruption about 200 years prior to the formation of the caldera. The thin, light-colored unit at the base of the lava flow, seen prominently on the right, is a Plinian pumice deposit from that major explosive eruption. The lava flow is more than 350 m thick and is overlain by tephra from the caldera-forming eruption of Crater Lake.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1981 (Smithsonian Institution).

Keywords: lava flow | caldera | outcrop | exposure | geology | stratigraphy


Crater Lake