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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-09516

The massive 9-km-wide, horseshoe-shaped Cha caldera truncates the summit of Fogo stratovolcano, the most prominent in the Cape Verde islands.  An ash plume (center) rises from the western flank of a steep-sided central cone, Pico, that rises more than 1 km above the caldera floor to form the 2829 m high point of the island.  Pico, which is capped by a 500-m-wide, 150-m-deep summit crater, was apparently in almost continuous activity from the time of Portuguese settlement in 1500 CE until about 1760.  Photo by Dick Moore, 1995 (U.S. Geological Survey).

The massive 9-km-wide, horseshoe-shaped Cha caldera truncates the summit of Fogo stratovolcano, the most prominent in the Cape Verde islands. An ash plume (center) rises from the western flank of a steep-sided central cone, Pico, that rises more than 1 km above the caldera floor to form the 2829 m high point of the island. Pico, which is capped by a 500-m-wide, 150-m-deep summit crater, was apparently in almost continuous activity from the time of Portuguese settlement in 1500 CE until about 1760.

Photo by Dick Moore, 1995 (U.S. Geological Survey).


Fogo