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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-11901

Plumes are visible from the eruption of Jebel at Tair rise above the volcano as seen from the U.S. Navy vessel USS Bainbridge on 2 October 2007, two days after the start of the eruption. The small, 3-km-wide island rises from a 1,200 m depth in the south-central Red Sea. Jebel at Tair (one of many variations of the name, including Djebel Teyr, Jabal at Tayr, and Jibbel Tir) is the northernmost known Holocene volcano in the Red Sea. Historical eruptions date back to the 18th century. Photo by Vincent J. Street, 2007 (U.S. Navy).

Plumes are visible from the eruption of Jebel at Tair rise above the volcano as seen from the U.S. Navy vessel USS Bainbridge on 2 October 2007, two days after the start of the eruption. The small, 3-km-wide island rises from a 1,200 m depth in the south-central Red Sea. Jebel at Tair (one of many variations of the name, including Djebel Teyr, Jabal at Tayr, and Jibbel Tir) is the northernmost known Holocene volcano in the Red Sea. Historical eruptions date back to the 18th century.

Photo by Vincent J. Street, 2007 (U.S. Navy).

Keywords: plume | volcanic island


Jebel at Tair