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Report on Witori (Papua New Guinea) — December 2003


Witori

Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network, vol. 28, no. 12 (December 2003)
Managing Editor: Richard Wunderman.

Witori (Papua New Guinea) All vents still degassing; low seismicity (5-7 VT earthquakes per day)

Please cite this report as:

Global Volcanism Program, 2003. Report on Witori (Papua New Guinea) (Wunderman, R., ed.). Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network, 28:12. Smithsonian Institution. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.GVP.BGVN200312-252080



Witori

Papua New Guinea

5.576°S, 150.516°E; summit elev. 724 m

All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


Pago remained quiet, with all vents continuing to release weak, thin white vapor during 10 October-14 December 2003. Seismicity was generally low, with daily averages of 5-7 small volcano-tectonic earthquakes. The highest number of daily events through 26 November were the 45 recorded on 28 October.

Geological Summary. The Witori caldera (5.5 x 7.5 km) on the northern coast of central New Britain contains the active Pago cone. The Buru caldera cuts the SW flank. The gently sloping outer flanks consist primarily of dacitic pyroclastic-flow and airfall deposits produced during a series of five major explosive eruptions from about 5,600 to 1,200 years ago, many of which may have been associated with caldera formation. The post-caldera Pago cone may have formed less than 350 years ago; it has grown to a height above the Witori caldera rim, and a series of ten dacitic lava flows from it covers much of the caldera floor. The youngest of these was erupted during 2002-2003 from vents extending from the summit nearly to the NW caldera wall.

Information Contacts: Ima Itikarai, Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), P.O. Box 386, Rabaul, Papua New Guinea.