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Report on Akutan (United States) — September 1986

Scientific Event Alert Network Bulletin, vol. 11, no. 9 (September 1986)
Managing Editor: Lindsay McClelland.

Akutan (United States) More June ash observations

Please cite this report as:

Global Volcanism Program, 1986. Report on Akutan (United States) (McClelland, L., ed.). Scientific Event Alert Network Bulletin, 11:9. Smithsonian Institution. https://doi.org/10.5479/si.GVP.SEAN198609-311320.

Volcano Profile |  Complete Bulletin


Akutan

United States

54.134°N, 165.986°W; summit elev. 1303 m

All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


John Reeder has received two additional June observations . . . . MarkAir captain Clint Schoenleber observed unusual amounts of black ash on the S flank on 14 June at 1315. The ash had not been present two days earlier. Only steam was emerging from the cinder cone in the caldera. Snow had fallen near the summit since the ashfall. At about 2000 the same day, Julie Hathaway of Dutch Harbor saw a dark cloud that probably emerged from Akutan and was drifting south. The cloud remained visible for ~1/2 hour. She saw a similar cloud between 2100 and 2130 and two more between then and 2400.

Geologic Background. One of the most active volcanoes of the Aleutian arc, Akutan contains 2-km-wide caldera with an active intracaldera cone. An older, largely buried caldera was formed during the late Pleistocene or early Holocene. Two volcanic centers are located on the NW flank. Lava Peak is of Pleistocene age, and a cinder cone lower on the flank produced a lava flow in 1852 that extended the shoreline of the island and forms Lava Point. The 60-365 m deep younger caldera was formed during a major explosive eruption about 1600 years ago and contains at least three lakes. The currently active large cinder cone in the NE part of the caldera has been the source of frequent explosive eruptions with occasional lava effusion that blankets the caldera floor. A lava flow in 1978 traveled through a narrow breach in the north caldera rim almost to the coast. Fumaroles occur at the base of the caldera cinder cone, and hot springs are located NE of the caldera at the head of Hot Springs Bay valley and along the shores of Hot Springs Bay.

Information Contacts: J. Reeder, ADGGS.