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Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia

Photo of this volcano
  • Italy
  • Cluster (Volcanic field)
  • 1867 CE
  • Country
  • Landform (Volc Type)
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 37.1°N
  • 12.7°E

  • -8 m
    -26 ft

  • 211070
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Weekly Report: 27 November-3 December 2002 Citation IconCite this Report

According to news articles, Enzo Boschi, the head of INGV, stated that seismicity increased near Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia a group of submarine volcanoes ~30 km S of Sicily, near Tunisia. Boschi stated, "The island could come back to the surface, but we'll have to wait and see... It could be a few weeks or months." The Stromboli On-Line website noted that similar statements have been made several times in the past couple of years. The increased seismicity does not necessarily signify that an eruption is imminent and the island will re-emerge above wave base.

Sources: Reuters, Stromboli On-Line

Weekly Reports - Index


2002: November


27 November-3 December 2002 Citation IconCite this Report

According to news articles, Enzo Boschi, the head of INGV, stated that seismicity increased near Campi Flegrei Mar Sicilia a group of submarine volcanoes ~30 km S of Sicily, near Tunisia. Boschi stated, "The island could come back to the surface, but we'll have to wait and see... It could be a few weeks or months." The Stromboli On-Line website noted that similar statements have been made several times in the past couple of years. The increased seismicity does not necessarily signify that an eruption is imminent and the island will re-emerge above wave base.

Sources: Reuters; Stromboli On-Line


The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History

There is data available for 6 confirmed Holocene eruptive periods.

[ 1911 Sep 30 ] Uncertain Eruption

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode Pinne
1911 Sep 30 - Unknown Evidence from Unknown

List of 1 Events for Episode 1 at Pinne

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
1911 Sep 30    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

1867 Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 0

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode Pinne
1867 - Unknown Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 1 Events for Episode 1 at Pinne

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
1867    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

1863 Aug 12 Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 2

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode Giulia Ferdinandeo
1863 Aug 12 - Unknown Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 2 Events for Episode 1 at Giulia Ferdinandeo

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
   - - - -    - - - - Island ephemeral
1863 Aug 12    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

1846 Oct 4 - 1846 Oct 5 Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 2

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode Pinne
1846 Oct 4 - 1846 Oct 5 Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 1 Events for Episode 1 at Pinne

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
1846 Oct 4    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

1831 Jun 28 (in or after) - 1831 Aug 11 ± 4 days Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 3

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode Giulia Ferdinandeo (Graham Island)
1831 Jun 28 (in or after) - 1831 Aug 11 ± 4 days Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 7 Events for Episode 1 at Giulia Ferdinandeo (Graham Island)

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
   - - - -    - - - - Ash violent, strong, or large
   - - - -    - - - - Lapilli
   - - - -    - - - - Scoria
   - - - -    - - - - Earthquakes (undefined) Before.
   - - - -    - - - - Island ephemeral
1831 Jun 28
(in or after)
   - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)
1831 Jul 10    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

[ 1701 ] Uncertain Eruption

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode Giulia Ferdinandeo
1701 - Unknown Evidence from Unknown

List of 2 Events for Episode 1 at Giulia Ferdinandeo

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
   - - - -    - - - - Island Uncertain
1701    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

1632 Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 0

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode Giulia Ferdinandeo
1632 - Unknown Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 1 Events for Episode 1 at Giulia Ferdinandeo

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
1632    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

0253 BCE ± 12 years Confirmed Eruption  

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode
0253 BCE ± 12 years - Unknown Evidence from Observations: Reported
Deformation History

There is no Deformation History data available for Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia.

Emission History

There is no Emissions History data available for Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia.

Photo Gallery

A column of steam and ash rises above the sea surface during the early phase of a submarine eruption in 1831 at Graham Island (Giulia Ferdinandeo) south of Sicily. Earthquakes were first reported on June 28. During the first few days, floating matter, boiling water, and dead fish were observed. On July 8 black smoke was ejected, and by the 12th pumice washed up on the shores of Sicily. A new, but short-lived island was first seen on July 16.

From the collection of Maurice and Katia Krafft.
Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia (Phlegraean Fields of the Sicily Sea) is a group of submarine volcanoes off the coast of Sicily. Submarine banks rise from a 1000-m-deep depression between Sicily and Tunisia to near sea level. Submarine eruptions have been recorded since the 3rd century BCE, including some that built ephemeral islands, such as this one at Graham Island (Giulia Ferdinandeo), in 1831.

From the collection of Maurice and Katia Krafft.
An eruption at Graham Island (Giulia Ferdinandeo) in the Sicilian Sea in 1831. A new island was formed that was promptly claimed by Italy, France, Britain, and Spain. The island quickly eroded to beneath the sea surface after the eruption ended. Graham Island (also known as Ferdinandeo Bank) is part of the Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia (Phlegraean Fields of the Sicily Sea), a group of submarine volcanoes constructed within a depression about 1,000 m deep, SW of Sicily.

From the collection of Maurice and Katia Krafft (published in Simkin and Siebert, 1994).
This painting of the eruption of Graham Island (Giulia Ferdinandeo) on 13 July 1831 shows late-stage Strombolian eruptions originating from several vents along a fissure. A submarine eruption that began sometime after 28 June eventually constructed a new island that reached a height of 65 m and a diameter of about 500 m. After August, when the eruption ended, the ephemeral island soon eroded beneath the sea.

From the collection of Maurice and Katia Krafft (published in Simkin and Siebert, 1994).
GVP Map Holdings

Maps are not currently available due to technical issues.

The maps shown below have been scanned from the GVP map archives and include the volcano on this page. Clicking on the small images will load the full 300 dpi map. Very small-scale maps (such as world maps) are not included.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database

There are no samples for Campi Flegrei del Mar di Sicilia in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

External Sites