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Kronotsky

Photo of this volcano
  • Russia
  • Eastern Kamchatka Volcanic Arc
  • Composite | Stratovolcano
  • 1923 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Province
  • Landform | Volc Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 54.753°N
  • 160.533°E

  • 3482 m
    11424 ft

  • 300200
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports available for Kronotsky.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Kronotsky.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Kronotsky.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History

There is data available for 3 confirmed Holocene eruptive periods.

1923 Feb Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 2

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode Summit and/or south flank (3150 m)
1923 Feb - Unknown Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 5 Events for Episode 1 at Summit and/or south flank (3150 m)

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
   - - - -    - - - - Explosion Uncertain
   - - - -    - - - - Phreatic activity
   - - - -    - - - - Flames
   - - - -    - - - - Audible Sounds
1923 Feb    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

1922 Nov Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 2

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode South flank (3150 m)
1922 Nov - Unknown Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 3 Events for Episode 1 at South flank (3150 m)

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
   - - - -    - - - - Phreatic activity
   - - - -    - - - - Volcanic "smoke"
1922 Nov    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

0050 BCE (?) Confirmed Eruption  

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode
0050 BCE (?) - Unknown Evidence from Correlation: Tephrochronology

List of 1 Events for Episode 1

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
   - - - -    - - - - Explosion
Deformation History

There is no Deformation History data available for Kronotsky.

Emission History

There is no Emissions History data available for Kronotsky.

Photo Gallery

Kronotsky is seen here to the NE of the broad summit of Krasheninnikov in the foreground. The slopes of the largely Pleistocene Kronotsky contain deep erosional valleys and had weak phreatic eruptions during the 20th century. Krasheninnikov has been active throughout the Holocene.

Photo by Yuri Doubik (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
Kronotsky is seen here beyond Lake Kronotskoye, Kamchatka's largest lake. The lake formed during the late-Pleistocene to early Holocene when a series of voluminous lava flows erupted from the south flank of Kronotsky, damming the Listvenichnaya River. The SE and SW flanks contain scoria cones, and weak phreatic eruptions took place during the 20th century.

Photo by Dan Miller, 1990 (U.S. Geological Survey).
Kronotsky rises NE of the Kronotsky River, shown across the bottom of the photo. A small cone above the river to the right is one of several on the SW flank. The crater to the lower right is a lake-filled maar that formed at the northern end of a rift zone extending 8 km NNE from Krasheninnikov. The maar erupted along the NE flank of a large Pleistocene caldera inside which Krasheninnikov formed.

Photo by Yuri Doubik (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
Kronotsky stratovolcano Is located between the Pacific Ocean and Lake Kronotsky, Kamchatka's largest lake. The flanks are dissected by radial valleys up to 200 m deep. Weak phreatic eruptions took place during the 20th century. Kronotsky is seen here from the SW with the caldera rim of neighboring Krasheninnikov volcano in the foreground.

Photo by Yuri Doubik (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
Kronotsky, seen here from the SW, towers above extensively eroded pyroclastic flow deposits. These voluminous deposits were produced by Pleistocene explosive eruptions that resulted in formation of the Uzon and Krasheninnikov calderas. The initial caldera-forming eruption at Uzon dates back to the mid-Pleistocene. A younger caldera formed about 39,000 years ago and was followed shortly by formation of the Krasheninnikov caldera.

Photo by Yuri Doubik (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
The flanks of Kronotsky contain radial erosional valleys up to 200 m deep. The summit, seen here from the north, consists of a basaltic-andesite lava extrusion. The conical, sharp-peaked volcano is one of the most distinctive in Kamchatka.

Photo by Oleg Volynets (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
GVP Map Holdings

Maps are not currently available due to technical issues.

The maps shown below have been scanned from the GVP map archives and include the volcano on this page. Clicking on the small images will load the full 300 dpi map. Very small-scale maps (such as world maps) are not included.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database

There are no samples for Kronotsky in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

External Sites