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Tenerife

Photo of this volcano
  • Spain
  • Atlantic Ocean
  • Stratovolcano
  • 1909 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 28.271°N
  • 16.641°W

  • 3715 m
    12188 ft

  • 383030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number
Most Recent Weekly Report: 12 May-18 May 2004 Citation IconCite this Report

Local volcanologists reported that there was increased seismicity at Tenerife in mid-May, according to a news article. The article stated that during several days before 18 May there were "five successive low-intensity earthquakes in the island's most volcanically active zone in the area between Mont Teide and Santiago del Teide." The director of the Estación Vulcanológica de Canarias stated that the earthquakes, which were less than M 2, could be an early sign that something unusual was happening at the volcano.

Source: Yorkshire Post Today News


Most Recent Bulletin Report: February 2006 (BGVN 31:02) Citation IconCite this Report

2004 seismic crisis; January 2005 escalation in monitored parameters at Tiede

Juan Carlos Carracedo notified Bulletin editors that seismic activity in Tenerife during April and May 2004 was not followed by any volcanic activity. More than 200 earthquakes from magnitude 1 to 3 were recorded, but residents felt only three of them. Most of the epicenters were localized around the NW rift zone of Tenerife and in the strait between Gran Canaria and Tenerife. The crisis was probably related to dike emplacement at 3-4 km depth.

On 12 January 2005, an increase in unrest at Tenerife's Teide volcano over the previous 2 weeks was reported. Carbon dioxide emissions rose from 75 to 354 tons per day, and hydrogen sulfide emissions rose from 35 to 152 tons per day. Seismic activity remained elevated under the volcano. Fumaroles increased in pressure, and emitted sounds. No significant ground deformation was observed.

In a recent article in Eos, scientists from Spain and The Netherlands (Garcia et al., 2006), described a monitoring program for the Canary Islands. They noted that the Canary Islands started to show signs of seismo-volcanic activity at the end of 2003. In spring 2004, there was a significant increase in the number of seismic events (a mixture of regional, volcano-tectonic, and volcanic events such as tremor and long-period signals) located beneath Tenerife Island. The authors also noted an increase of fumarolic activity, an increase in carbon dioxide emissions in the NW part of the island, and changes in the gravimetric field on the N flank. After several seismic events had been felt by the population, the first alert level was declared by the civil protection division of the local government.

The volcano has a history of large eruptions destructive to populated areas. The authors reported that in 1992, the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI) identified Teide, with its high-risk level, as one of the European Laboratory Volcanoes, thus receiving special consideration from the European Union concerning research proposals.

In the spring of 2005, the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) initiated the TEGETEIDE project (Geophysical and Geodetic Techniques for the Study of the Teide-Pico Active Volcanic Area). It will monitor the seismicity of the volcano and include background noise analysis. The system's main goal is to detect precursors to a potentially dangerous eruptive episode at an early stage. The scheme is to use signals in both the time and the spectral domains.

References. Garcia, A., Vila, J., Ortiz, R., Macia, R., Sleeman, R., Marrero, J.M., Sanchez, N., Tarraga, M., Correig, A.M., 2006, Monitoring the reawakening of Canary Islands' Teide Volcano: EOS Transactions, American Geophysical Union, v. 87, no. 6, p. 61, 65.

Information Contacts: Juan Carlos Carracedo, Estación Volcanológica de Canarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC, Spanish National Research Council), Serrano, 117 28006, Madrid, Spain; Josep Vila, Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona and Laboratori d'Estudis Geofísics "Eduard Fontserè," Institut d'Estudis Catalans, Barcelona, Spain.

Weekly Reports - Index


2004: May


12 May-18 May 2004 Citation IconCite this Report

Local volcanologists reported that there was increased seismicity at Tenerife in mid-May, according to a news article. The article stated that during several days before 18 May there were "five successive low-intensity earthquakes in the island's most volcanically active zone in the area between Mont Teide and Santiago del Teide." The director of the Estación Vulcanológica de Canarias stated that the earthquakes, which were less than M 2, could be an early sign that something unusual was happening at the volcano.

Source: Yorkshire Post Today News


Bulletin Reports - Index

Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

02/2006 (BGVN 31:02) 2004 seismic crisis; January 2005 escalation in monitored parameters at Tiede




Information is preliminary and subject to change. All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


February 2006 (BGVN 31:02) Citation IconCite this Report

2004 seismic crisis; January 2005 escalation in monitored parameters at Tiede

Juan Carlos Carracedo notified Bulletin editors that seismic activity in Tenerife during April and May 2004 was not followed by any volcanic activity. More than 200 earthquakes from magnitude 1 to 3 were recorded, but residents felt only three of them. Most of the epicenters were localized around the NW rift zone of Tenerife and in the strait between Gran Canaria and Tenerife. The crisis was probably related to dike emplacement at 3-4 km depth.

On 12 January 2005, an increase in unrest at Tenerife's Teide volcano over the previous 2 weeks was reported. Carbon dioxide emissions rose from 75 to 354 tons per day, and hydrogen sulfide emissions rose from 35 to 152 tons per day. Seismic activity remained elevated under the volcano. Fumaroles increased in pressure, and emitted sounds. No significant ground deformation was observed.

In a recent article in Eos, scientists from Spain and The Netherlands (Garcia et al., 2006), described a monitoring program for the Canary Islands. They noted that the Canary Islands started to show signs of seismo-volcanic activity at the end of 2003. In spring 2004, there was a significant increase in the number of seismic events (a mixture of regional, volcano-tectonic, and volcanic events such as tremor and long-period signals) located beneath Tenerife Island. The authors also noted an increase of fumarolic activity, an increase in carbon dioxide emissions in the NW part of the island, and changes in the gravimetric field on the N flank. After several seismic events had been felt by the population, the first alert level was declared by the civil protection division of the local government.

The volcano has a history of large eruptions destructive to populated areas. The authors reported that in 1992, the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI) identified Teide, with its high-risk level, as one of the European Laboratory Volcanoes, thus receiving special consideration from the European Union concerning research proposals.

In the spring of 2005, the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) initiated the TEGETEIDE project (Geophysical and Geodetic Techniques for the Study of the Teide-Pico Active Volcanic Area). It will monitor the seismicity of the volcano and include background noise analysis. The system's main goal is to detect precursors to a potentially dangerous eruptive episode at an early stage. The scheme is to use signals in both the time and the spectral domains.

References. Garcia, A., Vila, J., Ortiz, R., Macia, R., Sleeman, R., Marrero, J.M., Sanchez, N., Tarraga, M., Correig, A.M., 2006, Monitoring the reawakening of Canary Islands' Teide Volcano: EOS Transactions, American Geophysical Union, v. 87, no. 6, p. 61, 65.

Information Contacts: Juan Carlos Carracedo, Estación Volcanológica de Canarias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC, Spanish National Research Council), Serrano, 117 28006, Madrid, Spain; Josep Vila, Departament d'Astronomia i Meteorologia, Universitat de Barcelona and Laboratori d'Estudis Geofísics "Eduard Fontserè," Institut d'Estudis Catalans, Barcelona, Spain.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History

There is data available for 46 Holocene eruptive periods.

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1909 Nov 18 1909 Nov 27 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW rift zone (Chinyero)
1798 Jun 9 1798 Sep 14 (?) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations SW flank of Pico Viejo (Chahorra)
1706 May 5 1706 Jun 13 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW rift zone (Garachico)
1704 Dec 31 1705 Mar 27 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW rift zone (Siete Fuentes, Fasnia, Güímar)
1492 Aug 24 (in or before) Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations NW rift zone (Montaña Boca Cangrejo)
[ 1444 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1430 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1396 ± 3 years ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1341 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1060 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Montaña Reventada)
0800 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Radiocarbon (corrected) Pico de Tiede
0700 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NE rift zone (Volcán Negro)
0240 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW flank of Pico Viejo (Roques Blancos)
0190 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Cuevas Negras)
0090 ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Los Hornitos)
0040 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Teide-Pico Viejo complex
0030 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW flank of Pico Viejo (Roques Blancos)
0080 BCE ± 40 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected) Montaña Blanca, Pico Viejo
0520 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Teide-Pico Viejo complex
0580 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW flank of Teide (El Boquerón)
0670 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Volcán el Ciego)
1050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña de Cascajo)
1150 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide SW flank (Los Gemelos)
1400 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Samara)
1650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide SW flank (La Mancha Ruana)
1700 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Botija)
1980 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Montaña de Chío)
2250 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide SE flank (Montaña Majúa)
2300 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Cruz de Tea)
2650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Las Montañetas Negras)
2850 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide SE flank (Montaña de la Cruz)
3050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Bilma)
3450 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña Cruz)
3540 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) Teide NE flank (lower Montaña Abejera)
3750 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña del Estrucho)
3960 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) Teide NE flank (upper Montaña Abejera)
4200 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Montaña Cueve de Ratón)
4650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide NE flank (Montañas de los Corrales)
5250 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide E flank (Montaña de los Corrales)
5550 BCE ± 1500 years Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide N flank (Pico Cabras)
5750 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide NE flank (Montañas de los Conejos)
6200 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Montaña Liferfe)
6550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Teide NNE flank (Montaña del Abrunco)
6850 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montaña de Abeque)
7260 BCE ± 200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NE flank (Montaña Negra-Los Tomillos)
7550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NW rift zone (Montañas Negras)
Deformation History

There is data available for 5 deformation periods. Expand each entry for additional details.


Deformation during 1993 - 2000 [Subsidence; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 1993 Stop Date: 2000 Direction: Subsidence Method: InSAR
Magnitude: 9.000 cm Spatial Extent: 2.00 km Latitude: 28.000 Longitude: -17.000

Remarks: Garachico deformation located in the lava flows of the Montana Negra volcano. Subsidence possibly caused by water extraction from water table.

Figure (see Caption)

Differential interferogram of Tenerife, processed with 1993 July 20 and 2000 September 15 images: panel1, Garachicodeformation (three fringes); panel 2, Ch ??o deformation (one fringe); panel 3, cuttings/clippings of several differential interferograms of Tenerife, showing how the subsidence evolves in time. Above, Garachico deformation; below, Ch ??o deformation.

From: Fernandez et al. 2005.


Reference List: Fernandez et al. 2003; Fernandez et al. 2005.

Full References:

Fernandez J, Romero R, Carrasco D, Tiampo K F, Rodríguez-Velasco G, Aparicio A, Arana V, Gonzalez-Matesanz F J, 2005. Detection of displacements on Tenerife Island, Canaries, using radar interferometry. Geophysical Journal International, 160(1): 33-45.

Fernandez J, Yu T-T, Rodriguez-Velasco G, Gonzalez-Matesanz J, Romero R, Rodriguez G, Quiros R, Dalda A, Aparicio A, Blanco M J, 2003. New geodetic monitoring system in the volcanic island of Tenerife, Canaries, Spain. Combination of InSAR and GPS techniques. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 124: 241-253.

Deformation during 1993 - 2000 [Subsidence; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 1993 Stop Date: 2000 Direction: Subsidence Method: InSAR
Magnitude: 3.000 cm Spatial Extent: 2.00 km Latitude: 28.000 Longitude: -17.000

Remarks: Chio deformation located south of Garachico deformation in an area covered by basaltic material. Subsidence possibly caused by water extraction from water table.

Figure (see Caption)

Differential interferogram of Tenerife, processed with 1993 July 20 and 2000 September 15 images: panel1, Garachicodeformation (three fringes); panel 2, Ch ??o deformation (one fringe); panel 3, cuttings/clippings of several differential interferograms of Tenerife, showing how the subsidence evolves in time. Above, Garachico deformation; below, Ch ??o deformation.

From: Fernandez et al. 2005.


Reference List: Fernandez et al. 2003; Fernandez et al. 2005.

Full References:

Fernandez J, Romero R, Carrasco D, Tiampo K F, Rodríguez-Velasco G, Aparicio A, Arana V, Gonzalez-Matesanz F J, 2005. Detection of displacements on Tenerife Island, Canaries, using radar interferometry. Geophysical Journal International, 160(1): 33-45.

Fernandez J, Yu T-T, Rodriguez-Velasco G, Gonzalez-Matesanz J, Romero R, Rodriguez G, Quiros R, Dalda A, Aparicio A, Blanco M J, 2003. New geodetic monitoring system in the volcanic island of Tenerife, Canaries, Spain. Combination of InSAR and GPS techniques. J. Volcanol. Geotherm. Res., 124: 241-253.

Deformation during 1993 - 2005 [Subsidence; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 1993 Stop Date: 2005 Direction: Subsidence Method: InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: Unknown Latitude: 28.000 Longitude: -17.000

Remarks: Subsidence located in the upper section of the NE rift related to water extraction

Figure (see Caption)

SBAS-DInSAR results. (a) Geocoded mean deformation rate map computed in correspondence to coherent pixels only, and superimposed on the DEM of the island; the reported SAR azimuth and range directions (black arrows) are indicative. Blue arrows show the horizontal displacement measured with error ellipses determined using GPS observations between 2000 and 2006 at the stations of the GPS network. The white stars, labeled as ??b??, ??c??, ??d??, ??e?? and ??f??, identify the pixels whose DInSAR LOS deformation time series are shown in panels (b?f); note that in Figure 2f the deformation associated to the 2004 seismic crisis has been highlighted in orange. (g) Plot of the mean deformation rate values (for the pixels located in coherent areas) versus topography with the locations of the areas (black letters from ??b?? to ??f??) affected by localized deformation.

From: Fernandez et al. 2009.


Reference List: Fernandez et al. 2009.

Full References:

Fernandez J, Tizzani P, Manzo M, Borgia A, Gonzalez P J, Marti J, Pepe A, Camacho A G, Casu F, Berardino P, Prieto J F, Lanari R, 2009. Gravity-driven deformation of Tenerife measured by InSAR time series analysis. Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L04306. https://doi.org/10.1029/2008GL036920

Deformation during 1993 - 2005 [Subsidence; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 1993 Stop Date: 2005 Direction: Subsidence Method: InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: Unknown Latitude: 28.000 Longitude: -17.000

Remarks: Subsidence located within the south rift related to water extraction

Figure (see Caption)

SBAS-DInSAR results. (a) Geocoded mean deformation rate map computed in correspondence to coherent pixels only, and superimposed on the DEM of the island; the reported SAR azimuth and range directions (black arrows) are indicative. Blue arrows show the horizontal displacement measured with error ellipses determined using GPS observations between 2000 and 2006 at the stations of the GPS network. The white stars, labeled as ??b??, ??c??, ??d??, ??e?? and ??f??, identify the pixels whose DInSAR LOS deformation time series are shown in panels (b?f); note that in Figure 2f the deformation associated to the 2004 seismic crisis has been highlighted in orange. (g) Plot of the mean deformation rate values (for the pixels located in coherent areas) versus topography with the locations of the areas (black letters from ??b?? to ??f??) affected by localized deformation.

From: Fernandez et al. 2009.


Reference List: Fernandez et al. 2009.

Full References:

Fernandez J, Tizzani P, Manzo M, Borgia A, Gonzalez P J, Marti J, Pepe A, Camacho A G, Casu F, Berardino P, Prieto J F, Lanari R, 2009. Gravity-driven deformation of Tenerife measured by InSAR time series analysis. Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L04306. https://doi.org/10.1029/2008GL036920

Deformation during 1993 - 2005 [Subsidence; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 1993 Stop Date: 2005 Direction: Subsidence Method: InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: 40.00 km Latitude: 28.000 Longitude: -17.000

Remarks: Large-scale subsidence of the Teide-Pico Veijo volcano area, possibly due to gravitational sinking of the dense core of the island into a weak lithosphere

Figure (see Caption)

SBAS-DInSAR results. (a) Geocoded mean deformation rate map computed in correspondence to coherent pixels only, and superimposed on the DEM of the island; the reported SAR azimuth and range directions (black arrows) are indicative. Blue arrows show the horizontal displacement measured with error ellipses determined using GPS observations between 2000 and 2006 at the stations of the GPS network. The white stars, labeled as ??b??, ??c??, ??d??, ??e?? and ??f??, identify the pixels whose DInSAR LOS deformation time series are shown in panels (b?f); note that in Figure 2f the deformation associated to the 2004 seismic crisis has been highlighted in orange. (g) Plot of the mean deformation rate values (for the pixels located in coherent areas) versus topography with the locations of the areas (black letters from ??b?? to ??f??) affected by localized deformation.

From: Fernandez et al. 2009.


Reference List: Fernandez et al. 2009.

Full References:

Fernandez J, Tizzani P, Manzo M, Borgia A, Gonzalez P J, Marti J, Pepe A, Camacho A G, Casu F, Berardino P, Prieto J F, Lanari R, 2009. Gravity-driven deformation of Tenerife measured by InSAR time series analysis. Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L04306. https://doi.org/10.1029/2008GL036920

Emission History

There is no Emissions History data available for Tenerife.

Photo Gallery

The town of Garachico on the northwestern coast of Tenerife Island occupies a lava delta created during an 18th-century eruption. The Garachico cinder cone, which was formed during the 1706 eruption, produced a 7-km-long lava flow that descended nearly 1400 m to the sea, destroying much of the village of Tanque as well as the town and port of Garachico. The Roque de Garachico island at the top of the photo predates the lava flow.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
The arcuate rim of Las Cañadas caldera on Tenerife volcano in the Canary Islands rises in the distance above the flat-lying caldera floor. This view looks to the SE from the summit of Pico de Teide, a large stratovolcano constructed within the massive 10 x 17 km wide caldera. Dark-colored lava flows from Pico de Teide and other post-caldera cones mantle the caldera floor, which lies 300-m below the far caldera rim and 1700-m below the summit of Pico de Teide.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
Pico de Teide towers above the Llanos de Ucanca plain on the floor of Las Cañadas caldera. The rocky spires in the foreground are eroded remains of intrusive phonolitic rocks of the Cañadas formation, predating formation of the caldera. Youthful dark-colored lava flows blanket the SW (left) side of Teide. The upper limit of the snowfield just below the summit of Teide marks the rim of the summit crater.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
The 3715-m-high Teide stratovolcano, the highest peak in the Atlantic Ocean, dominates the island of Tenerife. Pico de Teide was constructed within the 10 x 17 km Las Cañadas caldera. The NE-trending Cordillera Dorsal volcanic massif joins the Las Cañadas volcano on the SW side of Tenerife with older volcanoes, creating the largest of the Canary Islands. Tenerife was observed in eruption by Christopher Columbus, and several other flank vents on the most active volcano of the Canary Islands have erupted during historical time.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
Trachytic lava flows with prominent lateral levees descend from the summit of Pico de Teide volcano and spill over the rim of an older crater. The pylon at the lower left and the building at left-center mark the upper part of an aerial cable car line that provides access to the 3715-m-high summit of Pico de Teide, the highest peak in the Atlantic Ocean.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
Steep-sided Pico de Teide rises to 3715 m on SW Tenerife Island. The summit cone is capped by a small 70-m-wide crater and was constructed within a larger crater, whose outer slopes form the light-colored areas at the right. A dramatic complex of overlapping obsidian-bearing lava flows with prominent levees descends from the summit and drapes the western flanks of the volcano. The age of the lava flows is not known, but they represent some of the most recent eruptive activity on Tenerife.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
A dark-colored trachytic lava flow descends the flanks of Pico de Teide volcano on Tenerife Island in the Canary archipelago. The viscous obsidian-bearing lava flow displays steep-sided lateral levees. These define individual lobes that diverged around a high point on the surface of the flow. Another lava flow, one of many youthful flows erupted from Pico de Teide, forms the dark streak at the top center of the photo just below the skyline.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
The summit of Pico de Teide volcano towers 1700 m above the floor of Las Cañadas caldera, whose southern caldera wall forms the craggy cliffs at the top of the photo. Fresh-looking unvegetated lava flows descend 7 km from the summit of Pico de Teide to the caldera wall, spreading across the light-colored sediments (upper left) on the broad caldera floor.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
Pico de Teide, the highest peak in the Atlantic Ocean, towers 1700 m above the floor of Las Cañadas caldera. The small nearly circular, 70-m-wide Caldereta crater truncates the summit of Pico de Teide. The prominent 750-m-wide summit crater of Pico Viejo, another post-caldera stratovolcano, appears to the WSW beyond the summit of Pico de Teide.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
Fresh-looking lava flows, seen here from the summit of Pico de Teide, descend towards Pico Viejo (top center) and diverge to the north and south along a broad saddle between the two volcanoes. A 750-m-wide crater truncates the summit of Pico Viejo, which was formed contemporaneously with Pico de Teide. These two stratovolcanoes were constructed within the 10 x 17 km wide Las Cañadas caldera, whose floor is visible in the distance.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
A prominent crater caps Pico Viejo, the second largest stratovolcano constructed within the massive Las Cañadas caldera. The sharp-peaked summit of the largest post-caldera volcano, Pico de Teide, casts a shadow (upper right) on the floor of the caldera. Dark-colored trachytic lava flows with prominent lateral levees descend at the lower right from the summit of Pico de Teide. A chain of youthful cinder cones, some of which erupted during historical time, occupies the caldera floor beyond Pico Viejo at the left.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1977.
Teide volcano, the highest point on the island of Tenerife, towers above the scarp of the massive Orotava landslide, which occurred about 600,000 years ago. The light-colored area on the eastern foot of the volcano (left) is covered by tephra deposits from the Plinian Montana Blanca eruption about 2,000 years ago. Teide was constructed within the 10 x 16 km wide Las Cañadas caldera on the SW side of Tenerife. The large triangular island is composed of a complex of overlapping stratovolcanoes that have remained active into historical time.

Photo by Alexander Belousov (Institute of Volcanology, Kliuchi).
GVP Map Holdings

The Global Volcanism Program has no maps available for Tenerife.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database

The following 3 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections, and may be availble for research (contact the Rock and Ore Collections Manager). Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description Lava Source Collection Date
NMNH 110021 Basalt -- --
NMNH 110022 Phonolite -- --
NMNH 110023 Rhyolitic Obsidian -- --
External Sites