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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-01205

Tambora's caldera, seen here from the western rim, was formed during the eruption of 1815 following the ejection of about 30-50 km3 DRE (dense rock equivalent) of ashfall and pyroclastic flows. This was history's largest explosive eruption and followed low-level eruptive activity that began in 1812. Only a few minor eruptions have taken place since formation of the 6-km-wide and 1,250-m-deep caldera. The last eruption produced a lava flow on the caldera floor and is known only to have occurred sometime between 1947 and 1968. Photo by Rizal Dasoeki, 1986 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).

Tambora's caldera, seen here from the western rim, was formed during the eruption of 1815 following the ejection of about 30-50 km3 DRE (dense rock equivalent) of ashfall and pyroclastic flows. This was history's largest explosive eruption and followed low-level eruptive activity that began in 1812. Only a few minor eruptions have taken place since formation of the 6-km-wide and 1,250-m-deep caldera. The last eruption produced a lava flow on the caldera floor and is known only to have occurred sometime between 1947 and 1968.

Photo by Rizal Dasoeki, 1986 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).

Keywords: caldera | stratigraphy


Tambora