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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-01391

Shichimenzan and Mayuyama are two lava domes that form the forested peaks in this 5 November 1991 view from the SW. Mayuyama, the closest dome, has an E-facing scarp resulting from a major debris avalanche in 1792 that swept into the Ariake Sea. The avalanche produced a catastrophic tsunami that swept the coast of Shimabara Peninsula and traveled across the bay, causing nearly 15,000 fatalities. The light-colored areas in the foreground are 1991 pyroclastic flow deposits. Photo by T. Kobayashi, 1991 (Kagoshima University).

Shichimenzan and Mayuyama are two lava domes that form the forested peaks in this 5 November 1991 view from the SW. Mayuyama, the closest dome, has an E-facing scarp resulting from a major debris avalanche in 1792 that swept into the Ariake Sea. The avalanche produced a catastrophic tsunami that swept the coast of Shimabara Peninsula and traveled across the bay, causing nearly 15,000 fatalities. The light-colored areas in the foreground are 1991 pyroclastic flow deposits.

Photo by T. Kobayashi, 1991 (Kagoshima University).

Creative Commons Icon This image is made available as a Public Domain Work, but proper attribution is appreciated.

Keywords: lava dome | block-and-ash flow | pyroclastic density current | deposit | human impacts


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