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Global Volcanism Program | Image GVP-05305

The small 2.5-km-wide Kaguyak caldera is filled by a lake that lies more than 550 m below the caldera rim, seen here from the west. A post-caldera lava dome extends into the lake on the SW side and another dome forms a small island in the center of the lake. The voluminous caldera-forming deposits have been radiocarbon dated at 5,800 years old. A large pre-caldera lava dome forms the high point on the eastern caldera rim. The broad valley of Big River descends to Shelikof Strait to the upper right. Photo by Chris Nye, 1982 (Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Alaska Volcano Observatory).

The small 2.5-km-wide Kaguyak caldera is filled by a lake that lies more than 550 m below the caldera rim, seen here from the west. A post-caldera lava dome extends into the lake on the SW side and another dome forms a small island in the center of the lake. The voluminous caldera-forming deposits have been radiocarbon dated at 5,800 years old. A large pre-caldera lava dome forms the high point on the eastern caldera rim. The broad valley of Big River descends to Shelikof Strait to the upper right.

Photo by Chris Nye, 1982 (Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Alaska Volcano Observatory).

Keywords: caldera | lake | lava dome | crater lake


Kaguyak