Agung

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 8.343°S
  • 115.508°E

  • 2995 m
    9824 ft

  • 264020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Weekly Report: 6 December-12 December 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


Based on BNPB and PVMBG reports, the eruption at Agung continued during 6-12 December, with high seismicity and nighttime crater incandescence often visible. On 8 December at 0759 an event generated a dense ash plume that rose 2.1 km above the crater rim and drifted W. Minor amounts of ash were deposited on the flanks, and lapilli was reported in Temakung. An ash plume rose 3 km at 1457. The number of evacuees on 10 December was 70,079 (spread out in 237 shelters). Ash plumes rose as high as 2 km. Lahars were observed in a drainage originating on the flanks of Agung. An explosion at 0549 on 11 December generated a dense ash plume that rose 2.5 km and drifted W and NW. Multiple ash-plume events were observed during 11-12 December, with plumes rising 1.5 km above the crater rim. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones continued at a general 8-km radius and 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM), Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


Most Recent Bulletin Report: March 2003 (BGVN 28:03) Citation IconCite this Report


Hot-spots located outside the summit crater are most likely due to fires

Thermal anomalies were detected by MODIS throughout 2001 and 2002 in zones proximal to the summit of Agung. The first alert occurred on 23 September 2001 when two alert-pixels were detected with a maximum alert ratio of -0.789. Larger anomalies were detected on 12 August 2002 (two alert-pixels with maximum alert ratio of -0.429) and 5 October 2002 (one alert-pixel with alert ratio of -0.536). All the alerts seem to occur outside the summit crater, with the possible exception of 5 October 2002, and are more likely to represent fires than volcanic activity.

No volcanic activity has been reported recently by the Volcanological Survey of Indonesia.

Information Contacts: Diego Coppola and David A. Rothery, Department of Earth Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK. Thermal alerts courtesy of the HIGP MODIS Thermal Alerts Team (URL: http://modis.higp.hawaii.edu/).

Weekly Reports - Index


2017: September | October | November | December


6 December-12 December 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


Based on BNPB and PVMBG reports, the eruption at Agung continued during 6-12 December, with high seismicity and nighttime crater incandescence often visible. On 8 December at 0759 an event generated a dense ash plume that rose 2.1 km above the crater rim and drifted W. Minor amounts of ash were deposited on the flanks, and lapilli was reported in Temakung. An ash plume rose 3 km at 1457. The number of evacuees on 10 December was 70,079 (spread out in 237 shelters). Ash plumes rose as high as 2 km. Lahars were observed in a drainage originating on the flanks of Agung. An explosion at 0549 on 11 December generated a dense ash plume that rose 2.5 km and drifted W and NW. Multiple ash-plume events were observed during 11-12 December, with plumes rising 1.5 km above the crater rim. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones continued at a general 8-km radius and 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


29 November-5 December 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


PVMBG reported that the eruption at Agung, which began on 21 November, continued during 30 November-5 December. On 29 November gray ash plumes levels were rising to 2 km above the crater rim, resulting in ashfall to the SE. During 30 November-5 December emissions continued to rise 2 km; most were white in color, but dense gray ash emissions were noted during 1-2 December. Satellite data indicated that lava effusion continued at least through 1 December, and the erupted volume of lava was estimated to be 20 million cubic meters, equivalent to about a third of the total crater volume. The base of the plume was often reddish during 29 November-5 December reflecting incandescence from lava in the crater. BNPB noted on 5 December that 63,885 evacuees were distributed in 225 evacuation shelters.

Lahars were first noted on 21 November and continued to be observed through 5 December. The lahars flowed down drainages on the S flank (along the Tukad Yehsa, Tukad Sabuh, and Tukad Beliaung drainages) and also down the Tukad Bara drainage on the N flank, impacting houses, roads, and agricultural areas. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones continued at a general 8-km radius and 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


22 November-28 November 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


PVMBG reported that at 1730 on 25 November, after the number of volcanic earthquakes significantly increased, ash plumes rose 1.5 km above Agung’s crater rim and drifted 12 km WSW. Ashfall was reported in areas SW including Besakih (7 km SW), hamlets in the upper part of Pempatan (7.5 km W), and Temukus, prompting remaining residents to evacuate to the S. Eight inbound and 13 outbound international flights were cancelled, affecting 2,087 passengers. Crater incandescence was observed at 2100, signifying the presence of lava in the crater. BNPB noted that the number of evacuees was 25,016 (spread out in 224 shelters)

On 26 November dark gray ash plumes rose 2 km at 0505, 3 km at 0545, and 4 km at 0620, and drifted E and SE. Ash emissions continued throughout the day; a few explosions were heard within a 12-km radius. PVMBG issued a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation (VONA) elevating the Aviation Color Code from Orange to Red. Satellite data recorded sulfur dioxide gas concentrations ranging from 1,000 to 2,000 tons/day. Ashfall was reported in several areas downwind including North Duda (9 km S), Duda Timur (12 km S), Pempetan, Besakih, Sideman (15 km SSW), Tirta Abang, Sebudi (6 km SW), Amerta Bhuana (10 km SSW) in Klungkung, and some villages in Gianyar (20 km WSW). Ashfall was the thickest (5 mm) in Sibetan (11.5 km S). News sources noted that Lombok International Airport closed during 26-27 November.

PVMBG raised the Alert Level to 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) on 27 November, and the exclusion zones were expanded to a general 8-km radius and to 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions. Dense ash plumes continued to rise 2-4 km above the crater rim. Based on satellite data, the Darwin VAAC reported that ash plumes rose as high as 9.1 km (30,000 ft) a.s.l., or just over 6 km above the crater rim. Pictures and video showed a white steam plume adjacent to a gray ash plume rising form the crater, signifying two distinct active vents. According to news articles the Ngurah Rai International Airport in Bali closed due to the airborne ash. On 28 November BNPB noted that the number of evacuees had increased to 38,678, and were distributed in 225 evacuation centers. The Ngurah Rai International Airport reopened on 29 November, after the Aviation Color Code was lowered to Orange.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); CNN; Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB); The Sun


15 November-21 November 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


PVMBG reported that a phreatic eruption at Agung began at 1705 on 21 November, following a low-frequency tremor signal. An ash plume rose 700 m above the crater rim and drifted ESE. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones remained intact (at 6 km, and an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions).

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


8 November-14 November 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


PVMBG reported that white plumes from Agung rose as high as 500 m above the crater rim during 8-14 November. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones remained intact (at 6 km, and an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


1 November-7 November 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


PVMBG reported that white plumes from Agung rose as high as 500 m above the crater rim during 1-7 November. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones remained at 6 km, with an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


25 October-31 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


On 29 October PVMBG lowered the Alert level for Agung to 3 (on a scale of 1-4), noting a decline in activity, especially since 20 October. The thermal anomaly in the crater identified in satellite data was less intense in October than in September. Beginning on 20 October GPS data showed a slower deformation rate. Seismic signals decreased in number and amplitude, though low-frequency events continued to indicate magma movement. White fumarolic plumes rose as high as 500 m above the crater rim during 20-29 October; a comparison of video taken by drones on 20 and 29 October showed a relative decrease in the intensity of fumarolic emissions. BNPB stated that, despite the decreased Alert Level, the exclusion zones remained intact (at 6 km, and an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions). The number of evacuees was 133,457 (spread out in 385 shelters).

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


18 October-24 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


PVMBG reported that although foggy conditions at Agung occasionally prevented visual observations, during 18-24 October dense white plumes were seen rising as high as 500 m above the crater rim. Seismicity fluctuated but remained high, though BNPB reported that overall seismicity had decreased. According to BNPB a team launched a drone on 19 October and were able to capture video of the fumarolic emissions from several vents and cracks in the crater. The Alert Level remained at 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone at 9 km, and an additional expansion to 12 km in the SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


11 October-17 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


PVMBG reported that although foggy conditions at Agung sometimes prevented visual observations, during 11-17 October dense white plumes were seen rising 200 m above the crater rim. On 14 October BNPB stated that seismicity remained high; PVMBG noted that seismicity was dominated by shallow volcanic events, and the number of volcanic earthquakes remained steady. The governor of Bali extended the state of emergency to 26 October, noting that the Alert Level remained at 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4). The number of evacuees was 139,199 (spread out in 389 shelters).

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


4 October-10 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


On 5 October PVMBG reported that the rate of volcanic earthquakes at Agung had not increased during the previous 12 days, but continued to fluctuate at a high level. The seismic network detected 1-3 earthquakes per minute on average, with a total more than 600 events per day. The number of shallow volcanic earthquakes increased to 200 per day during 24 September-5 October, possibly indicating that magmatic activity at shallow depths was still high. The number of earthquakes felt by staff at the Mt. Agung Volcano Observatory in Rendang village, 12.5 km SSW, peaked on 27 September and then decreased afterwards. Gas plumes rose 50-200 m above the crater rim. Satellite data indicated an area of water expulsion near the solfatara field on the crater floor thought to reflect a disturbance to the hydrologic system in response to intruded magma at depth. On 5 October BNPB reported that the number of evacuees reached 146,797 (spread out in 427 shelters), though about 28 villages (70,000 people) were located within the evacuation zone. About 10,000 farm animals had also been evacuated. On 7 October a white plume likely composed mostly of water vapor rose 1.5 km above the crater rim and slowly drifted E. During 8-10 October fumarolic plumes rose 50-200 m above the rim. The Alert Level remained at 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone at 9 km, and an additional expansion to 12 km in the SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


27 September-3 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


On 29 September PVMBG reported that earthquakes at Agung were becoming stronger with more felt by local residents, and larger ones felt in areas 45-55 km SW including Denpasar and Kuta. Fumarolic emissions were identified in satellite data, as well as hot areas on the crater floor that had enlarged over the previous week. A new fracture on the crater floor emitted steam. After a M 4.2 earthquake was detected at 1627 on 26 September emissions intensified and rose 500 m above the crater rim. On 4 October BNPB reported that seismicity continued to fluctuate at high levels, and weak emissions rose above the crater rim. The number of evacuees reached 141,213 (spread out in 416 shelters) from 78 villages, though about 2,600 in locations outside of the evacuation zone were returning home; there were 28 villages (about 70,000 people) within the evacuation zone. The Alert Level remained at 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone at 9 km, and an additional expansion to 12 km in the SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


20 September-26 September 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


BNPB noted that as of 1300 on 22 September there were 9,421 people displaced from the evacuation zones at Agung. Seismicity continued to increase, therefore later that day on 22 September PVMBG raised the Alert Level to 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) and expanded the exclusion zone to 9 km, with an additional expansion to 12 km in the SE, S, and SW directions. On 24 September BNPB reported that the number of evacuees continued to grow, as residents were leaving the expanded evacuation zones; there were 34,931 people in 238 shelters. The report noted that some people were returning home in the daytime to feed their livestock. On 27 September the number of evacuees reached 96,086 (spread out in 430 shelters), seismic activity continued to escalate, and diffuse white plumes rose 50 m above the crater rim.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


13 September-19 September 2017 Citation IconCite this Report


Increased seismicity at Agung, as well as the severity of past eruptions, prompted PVMBG to raise the Alert Level to 2 (on a scale of 1-4). The report noted that volcanic earthquakes (VA) began to be recorded on 10 August and shallow volcanic earthquakes (VB) began to be recorded on 24 August. Local tectonic earthquakes were also recorded and began to increase consistently on 26 August. PVMBG warned the public to stay at least 3 km away from the crater. On 13 September a climber observed a sulfatara plume rising from the bottom of the crater as high as 50 m above the crater rim. During 14-18 September four earthquakes centered around Agung were felt. On 18 September PVMBG reported that the number of VA and VB events continued to increase; the Alert Level was increased to 3. The exclusion zone was increased to 6 km, with an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the N, SE, and SSW directions. Elevations above 950 m were also restricted.

A VEI 5 eruption during 1963-64 produced pyroclastic flows and lahars that caused extensive damage and resulted in more than 1,100 deaths.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


Bulletin Reports - Index


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

07/1989 (SEAN 14:07) Fumarolic activity

11/1989 (SEAN 14:11) Occasional seismicity but solfatara field quiet

03/2003 (BGVN 28:03) Hot-spots located outside the summit crater are most likely due to fires




Information is preliminary and subject to change. All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


July 1989 (SEAN 14:07) Citation IconCite this Report


Fumarolic activity

Fumarolic and solfataric activity (restricted to the crater) emitted a thin white plume periodically seen from the observatory. In late July, 69 tectonic, three volcanic A-type, and six volcanic B-type events were recorded.

Information Contacts: VSI.


November 1989 (SEAN 14:11) Citation IconCite this Report


Occasional seismicity but solfatara field quiet

Observations from both Rendang (S) and Budakeling (N) Observatories revealed neither white plumes from the solfatara field nor collapses of loose material from the inner crater wall. No explosion sounds from the crater have been heard. An earthquake was felt (MM I) on 9 June; 59 tectonic and two volcanic shocks [were] recorded in November.

Information Contacts: VSI.


March 2003 (BGVN 28:03) Citation IconCite this Report


Hot-spots located outside the summit crater are most likely due to fires

Thermal anomalies were detected by MODIS throughout 2001 and 2002 in zones proximal to the summit of Agung. The first alert occurred on 23 September 2001 when two alert-pixels were detected with a maximum alert ratio of -0.789. Larger anomalies were detected on 12 August 2002 (two alert-pixels with maximum alert ratio of -0.429) and 5 October 2002 (one alert-pixel with alert ratio of -0.536). All the alerts seem to occur outside the summit crater, with the possible exception of 5 October 2002, and are more likely to represent fires than volcanic activity.

No volcanic activity has been reported recently by the Volcanological Survey of Indonesia.

Information Contacts: Diego Coppola and David A. Rothery, Department of Earth Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK. Thermal alerts courtesy of the HIGP MODIS Thermal Alerts Team (URL: http://modis.higp.hawaii.edu/).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History


There is data available for 4 Holocene eruptive periods.


Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1963 Feb 18 1964 Jan 27 Confirmed 5 Historical Observations
1843 Unknown Confirmed 5 Historical Observations
[ 1821 Mar 16 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1808 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations

Deformation History


There is data available for 1 deformation periods. Expand each entry for additional details.


Deformation during 2006 - 2009 [Uplift; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 2006 Stop Date: 2009 Direction: Uplift Method: InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: Unknown Latitude: Unknown Longitude: Unknown

Remarks: Shallow-sourced inflation at Agung has so far not resulted in eruption.

Averaged 2006?2009 LOS velocity map of the west Sunda volcanic arc, Indonesia, from ALOS InSAR time series, overlaying SRTM V4 DEM. Only pixels with a temporal coherence larger than 0.6 are shown. Black arrows: relative plate convergence rates at the Sunda trench (red line). Insets: zoom into 7 deforming volcanic centers, upper left: inflating volcanoes, lower right: deflating volcano.

From: Chaussard and Amelung 2012.


Reference List: Chaussard and Amelung 2012.

Full References:

Chaussard, E., and F. Amelung, 2012. Precursory inflation of shallow magma reservoirs at west Sunda volcanoes detected by InSAR. Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L21311, doi:10.1029/2012GL053817.

Emission History


There is no Emissions History data available for Agung.

Photo Gallery


An eruption column towers above Bali's Agung volcano on March 12, 1963. Five days later a devastating eruption produced pyroclastic flows and lahars that killed 1148 people. Another powerful eruption on May 16 caused additional fatalities. The eruption left tens of thousands homeless.

Photo by K. Kusumadinata, 1963 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
See title for photo information.
An ash cloud rises above the summit crater of Agung volcano on March 17, 1963, during the first of two powerful explosive eruptions that caused much devastation to the island of Bali. The eruption began on February 19 as andesitic lava flowed down the northern flank. Major explosive eruptions on March 17 and May 16 produced devastating pyroclastic flows and lahars that killed more than 1100 people.

Photo by Djazuli, 1963 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
See title for photo information.
The summit of Bali's Gunung Agung volcano contains a steep-walled, 500-m-wide, 200-m-deep crater that is the source of Agung's historical eruptions. Grayish layers of lava flows and brownish tephra layers from explosive eruptions are exposed in the crater wall.

Photo by Sumarna Hamidi, 1973 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
See title for photo information.
The summit of Agung volcano marks the highest point on the island of Bali. The broad irregular volcanic massif in the far distance is the 11 x 6 km wide Bratan caldera in north-central Bali. Batukau, the largest of several post-caldera cones overtopping the southern rim, is the sharp peak at the left. Three lakes occupy the floor of Bratan caldera. Many of the cones are quite old, but some postdate the youngest dacitic pumice eruptions of Batur volcano (<23,000 years ago).

Photo by Sumarma Hamidi, 1973 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
See title for photo information.
Agung volcano towers over the eastern end of the island of Bali. A steep-walled, 200-m-deep crater is located at the summit of the 3142-m-high volcano, seen here from the Sakta River on the eastern flank. Only three eruptions have been recorded in historical time from Gunung Agung; the latest, during 1963-64, produced devastating pyroclastic flows and lahars.

Photo by Tom Pierson, 1989 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Gunung Agung, Bali's sacred mountain, towers above rice fields near the Gunungapi Rendang volcano observation post of the Volcanological Survey of Indonesia. The 3142-m-high stratovolcano has erupted infrequently during historical time, but its 1963 eruption was one of the most devastating in Indonesia during the 20th century.

Photo by M.E. Ilyas, 1991 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
See title for photo information.

Smithsonian Sample Collections Database


The following 7 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections, and may be availble for research (contact the Rock and Ore Collections Manager). Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description Lava Source Collection Date
NMNH 116957-1 Scoria -- 1 Oct 1979
NMNH 116957-2 Scoria -- 1 Oct 1979
NMNH 116957-3 Lava -- --
NMNH 117584-1 Andesite -- --
NMNH 117584-2 Andesite -- --
NMNH 117584-3 Ash -- --
NMNH 117584-4 Andesite -- --

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