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Agung

Photo of this volcano
  • Country
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  •  
  • 8.343°S
  • 115.508°E

  • 2997 m
    9833 ft

  • 264020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number
Most Recent Weekly Report: 30 March-5 April 2022 Citation IconCite this Report

Based on ground reports, satellite imagery, and wind model data, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 3 April an ash plume from Agung rose to 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. The Alert Level remained at 1 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)

Weekly Reports - Index


2022: March
2021: September
2020: July
2019: February | March | April | May | June
2018: January | February | March | April | May | June | July | August
2017: September | October | November | December


30 March-5 April 2022 Citation IconCite this Report

Based on ground reports, satellite imagery, and wind model data, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 3 April an ash plume from Agung rose to 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. The Alert Level remained at 1 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


15 September-21 September 2021 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that activity at Agung was last observed on 13 June 2019 and a thermal anomaly over the crater was last identified in satellite images in October 2019. During the previous year deformation data indicated no changes at the volcano and seismicity decreased. During 1 Janaury-13 September white gas-and-steam plumes rose 20-50 m above the summit. On 13 September the Alert Level was lowered to 1 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


15 July-21 July 2020 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that the last eruption at Agung was recorded at 0138 on 13 June 2019. Over the past year seismicity had generally decreased; volcanic earthquakes continued to be recorded but at a low occurrence rate. Deformation data indicated a deflationary pattern which had stabilized in recent months. A thermal anomaly was last visible in satellite data in October 2019 and did not reappear. White plumes were visible rising 20-150 m above the summit during 1 January-16 July. PVMBG lowered the Alert Level at Agung to 2 (on a scale of 1-4) on 16 July, stating that the public should not enter an exclusion zone set at a 2-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


12 June-18 June 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that an eruption at Agung, recorded by the seismic network at 0138 on 13 June, ejected incandescent material onto the flanks. The Darwin VAAC stated that ash plumes rose to altitudes of 5.5 and 9.1 km (18,000 and 30,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted W and SW, respectively, based on webcam views and satellite data. By 0635 the ash plume had detached and by 1505 it was about 370 km S of Agung. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4 km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


5 June-11 June 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1212 on 10 June an explosion at Agung produced a gray ash plume that rose about 1 km and drifted SE and E. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


29 May-4 June 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1142 on 31 May an explosion at Agung produced a dense gray ash plume that rose 2 km and drifted NE and E. Roaring was audible from the Agung Volcano Observatory in Rendang (about 8 km SW). The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


22 May-28 May 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1923 on 24 May an explosion at Agung ejected incandescent material radially onto the flanks as far as 3 km from the crater rim, setting fire to some vegetation. A dense gray-white ash plume rose 2 km and, based on satellite data, drifted SW, causing thick ashfall in several villages to the S. Roaring was audible from the Agung Volcano Observatory in Rendang (about 8 km SW). According to a news article several flights to and from Australia were cancelled or diverted, though the International Gusti Ngurah Rai (IGNR) airport (60 km SW) in Denpasar was not closed. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB); The Jakarta Post


15 May-21 May 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1409 on 18 May an explosion at Agung ejected incandescent material radially onto the flanks as far as 2.5 km from the crater rim. A dense gray-white ash plume rose 2 km and drifted NE, E, and SE, causing ashfall in hamlets downwind including Cutcut, Tongtongan, Bonyoh, and Temakung. A weak roar was audible from the Agung Volcano Observatory in Rendang (about 8 km SW). The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


8 May-14 May 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG and BNPB reported that an eruptive event at Agung was recorded by the seismic network at 2229 on 12 May, accompanied by a loud bang audible at the Agung Volcano Observatory in Rendang (about 8 km SW). Dense fog prevented height estimates of the ash plume. A photo posted along with the report showed that incandescent material was deposited on the flanks. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


1 May-7 May 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that an event at Agung was recorded by the seismic network at 1859 on 3 May. An ash plume was not visible from the Agung Volcano Observatory in Rendang (about 8 km SW), although the Darwin VAAC report a growing thermal anomaly and possible ash near the summit. About 30 minutes later the VAAC reported that an ash plume rose to 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NE; a thermal anomaly continued to be visible. On 6 May at 2255 a gray ash plume rose to around 2 km above the crater rim and drifted W. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


24 April-30 April 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 0534 on 30 April a dense gray ash plume from Agung rose 1 km above the crater rim and drifted E. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


17 April-23 April 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported two explosive eruptions at Agung on 21 April. The first was recorded at 0321 and produced a dense gray ash plume that rose 2 km above the crater rim and drifted W and S. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind including Besakih (7 km SW), Rendang (12 km NW), Klungkung (~40 km S), Gianyar (20 km WSW), Bangli (17 km WNW), Tabanan (51 km WSW), and the International Gusti Ngurah Rai (IGNR) airport (60 km SW) in Denpasar. The second event was recorded at 1856 and generated a dense ash plume that rose 3 km and drifted S. Minor ashfall was reported in Besakih, Rendang, Sebudi (6 km SW), and Selat (12 km SSW). The eruptions were accompanied by a boom heard at both the Rendang and Batulompeh observation posts. Ejected incandescent material from the two events fell on the flanks in all directions within a radius of 4 km. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


10 April-16 April 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1847 on 11 April an explosion at Agung produced a dense gray ash plume that rose 2 km above the crater rim and drifted W. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


3 April-9 April 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1331 on 4 April an explosion at Agung ejected incandescent material out of the crater and onto the flanks within a 2-3 km radius, mainly on the S flank. A dense gray ash plume rose 2 km above the crater rim and, based on satellite data, drifted W and S. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind including Telungbuana, Badeg, Besakih (7 km SW), Pempatan (8 km W), Teges, and Puregai. Roaring was heard at the observation post in Rendang (12 km NW). The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


27 March-2 April 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

At 1825 on 28 March an ash plume from Agung rose above the crater to an altitude of 5.5 km (18,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW according to PVMBG and the Darwin VAAC. A thermal anomaly was visible in satellite data. Ashfall was reported in nearby villages. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


20 March-26 March 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 0018 on 21 March an event at Agung was recorded for 1 minute and 47 seconds by the seismic network. Weather conditions prevented visual observations of the summit. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


13 March-19 March 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1827 on 15 March an explosive event at Agung was recorded for one minute and 23 seconds and produced a dense gray ash plume that rose about 1 km above the crater rim and drifted NNW. Minor ashfall was reported in the villages of Kubu (6 km N), Tianyar (14 km NNW), Ban, Kadundung, and Sukadana. At 0803 on 17 March an event was recorded for 39 seconds and produced a dense gray ash plume that rose about 500 m above the crater rim and drifted E. A second event began at 1030 and lasted about one minute and 16 seconds; a dense gray ash plume rose about 600 m and drifted E. At 0736 on 18 March an ash plume rose 1 km and drifted W and NW. Thermal satellite images continue to indicate hot areas in the crater on the previously-erupted lava surface especially near the flow margins. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


6 March-12 March 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 0452 on 4 March an event at Agung was recorded for just under three minutes and produced ashfall in Besakih (7 km SW) around 0615. No ash plume was visible although foggy conditions prevented views of the summit. An event that began at 0047 on 9 March lasted for 3 minutes and 50 seconds, and produced an ash plume that drifted E. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


20 February-26 February 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1631 on 22 February an event at Agung generated an ash plume that rose 700 m and drifted E. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


13 February-19 February 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that an explosive event at Agung was recorded at 0434 on 14 February, causing ashfall in Bugbug village, 20 km SE. Crater incandescence was recorded at night by webcams in Karangasem City (16 km SE). The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


6 February-12 February 2019 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that a 97-second-long explosive event at Agung began at 0012 on 8 February. A plume was not visible, though webcams recorded crater incandescence. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


15 August-21 August 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

According to the Darwin VAAC, a webcam recorded a diffuse ash emission from Agung rising to an altitude of 3.3 km (11,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifting W on 17 August. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone was stable at a 4-km radius.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


8 August-14 August 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

According to the Darwin VAAC, a webcam recorded an ash emission from Agung rising to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifting W. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Sources: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC); Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


1 August-7 August 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that white plumes rose 100-300 m above Agung’s crater rim during 1 and 2-7 August. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone set at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


25 July-31 July 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

According to PVMBG a ground-based observer reported that at 0041 on 25 July an event at Agung produced a dense ash-and-gas plume that rose 700 m and drifted E and SE. Seismic data recorded the event for two minutes and 15 seconds. At 1406 on 27 July an event lasting one minute and 32 seconds produced a dense ash-and-gas plume that rose 2 km and drifted W. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone was stable at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


18 July-24 July 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that plumes rose 200-500 m above Agung’s crater rim on 18, 20, and 23 July. Gray plumes rose as high as 1.5 km on 22 July. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone was stable at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


11 July-17 July 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that an event at 1409 on 13 July generated an ash plume that rose 1.5 km above Agung’s crater rim and drifted W. An event was detected at 0452 on 15 July, though no ash was visible. An ash plume from an event at 0905 rose 1.5 km and drifted W and SE. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone was unchanged at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


4 July-10 July 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that the eruption at Agung continued during 4-10 July. Sulfur dioxide flux was 1,400-2,400 tons/day on 3 July and 400-1,500 tons/day on 4 July. Satellite data acquired on 4 July indicated continuing lava effusion in the crater, with 4-5 million cubic meters effused in the past week. At 1220 an ash plume rose 2.5 km above the crater rim and drifted W. An event was detected at 2216, though an ash plume was not visible possibly due to poor viewing conditions. At 0047 on 5 July an ash plume rose at least 1 km and drifted W, and an event at 1633 produced an ash plume that rose 2.8 km and drifted E and W. A small event was detected on 6 July. According to BNPB a third Strombolian event occurred at 0522 on 8 July, generating an ash plume that rose 2 km. They noted that 4,415 evacuees were housed in 54 evacuation centers. An ash plume rose from the crater at 1120 on 9 July and drifted W. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone was stable at a 4-km radius.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


27 June-3 July 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that seismicity at Agung continued to be dominated by low-frequency events. The number of earthquakes increased from 15/day on 25 June to 69/day on 28 June; harmonic tremor emerged on 27 June, and at 2221 an event generated an ash plume that rose 2 km above the crater rim and drifted W. Gas-and-ash emissions were continuous during 28-29 June, rising around 2 km and drifting W and SW, and incandescence was reflected in the plume; satellite data confirmed that high-temperature (1,200 degrees Celsius) lava flowed onto the crater floor. The intensity of the thermal anomaly on 29 June was the largest recorded at Agung since the beginning of the eruption on 21 November 2017.

BNPB noted that the ash plumes on 28 June caused some airlines to cancel flights to Bali, and ashfall was reported in several villages on Bangli. The International Gusti Ngurah Rai (IGNR) airport (60 km SW) in Denpasar, the Blimbing Sari Airport (128 km W) in Banyuwangi, and the Noto Hadinegoro Airport (200 km W) in Jember closed for portions of the day on 29 June.

Lava continued to effuse, and by 1 July the estimated volume of new lava was 4-5 million cubic meters making the total volume erupted since 21 November 2017 around 27-28 million cubic meters (50% of the total crater volume). The height difference between the lowest part of the crater rim (SW side) and the highest part of the lava surface (in the center of the crater) was 85-90 m. Satellite data showed that the intensity of the thermal anomaly decreased during 28 June-2 July, though still remained at a high level. At 2104 on 2 July an explosion generated an ash plume that rose 7-9 km above the crater rim, and ejected incandescent lava as far as 2 km onto the flanks. News articles noted that the deposits caused forest fires on the upper flanks, and that the event prompted about 700 people to evacuate. An event at 0413 on 3 July generated an ash plume that rose around 2 km. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone was stable at a 4-km radius.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB); Associated Press


13 June-19 June 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1105 on 13 June an event at Agung produced a dense ash plume that rose around 2 km above the crater rim and drifted SW and W. Based on analysis of the seismic data, the event lasted two minutes and 12 seconds. Another event was detected at 2115 on 15 June, though foggy conditions prevented estimations of the ash plume height; ash fell in areas W, including in Puregai (7 km W). The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the 4-km-radius exclusion zone was unchanged.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


6 June-12 June 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that during 1 May-7 June activity at Agung remained at a relatively high level. Emissions were mostly water vapor, occasionally with ash. In general, tiltmeter and GPS showed long-term deflation since December 2017, though inflation began to be detected the second week of May; deformation analysis indicated that magma continued to accumulate about 3-4 km below the crater. Low- and high-frequency earthquakes also suggested rising magma. Sulfur dioxide flux was 190-203 tons/day, and thermal anomalies in the crater were identified in satellite data. The erupted volume of lava was estimated to be 23 million cubic meters, equivalent to about a third of the total crater volume. At 2214 on 10 June an event generated an ash plume that drifted W at an unspecified altitude. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone was stable at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


23 May-29 May 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that although there were some periods of foggy conditions during 23-29 May, white plumes were occasionally observed rising as high as 400 m above Agung’s crater rim. At 0539 on 29 May an event generated an ash plume that rose 500 m above the crater rim and drifted SW. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


16 May-22 May 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1719 on 19 May an event at Agung generated an ash plume that rose 1 km above the crater rim and drifted SE. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


25 April-1 May 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 2245 on 30 April an event at Agung generated an ash plume that rose 1.5 km above the crater rim and drifted SW. Seismicity was dominated by low-frequency earthquakes related to gas-and-steam emissions. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


18 April-24 April 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that although there were often foggy conditions during 18-24 April, white plumes were observed rising as high as 300 m above Agung’s crater rim and drifting E. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


11 April-17 April 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

Based on webcam views, satellite data, and ground-based observations, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 11 April an event at Agung generated an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW.

Sources: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC); Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


4 April-10 April 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that an event at Agung at 1737 on 5 April generated an ash plume that rose 500 m above the crater rim and drifted W. Seismicity was dominated by high- and low-frequency earthquakes. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


21 March-27 March 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

In a VONA, PVMBG reported that at 1009 on 26 March an event at Agung generated an ash plume that rose at least to an altitude of 3.6 km (11,650 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


7 March-13 March 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that although there were sometimes foggy conditions during 7-13 March, white plumes were observed rising as high as 600 m above Agung’s crater rim and drifting E. An event at 2332 on 11 March generated an ash plume that rose about 950 m and drifted E. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


28 February-6 March 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that on 28 February gray-white plumes rose as high as 300 m above Agung’s crater rim. During 1-5 March white plumes rose as high as 500 m above the crater rim. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


14 February-20 February 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that an event at Agung recorded at 1149 on 13 February generated an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 4.5 km (14,900 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 4-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


7 February-13 February 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

On 10 February PVMBG reported that activity at Agung had declined during the previous month or two leading the observatory to lower the Alert Level to 3 (on a scale of 1-4) and adjusted the exclusion zone to a 4-km radius. The report noted that the tallest eruption plume in January was 2.5 km above the crater rim, occurring on 19 January, and the last event on 24 January generated a plume that rose 1 km. The volume of erupted lava was an estimated 20 million cubic meters in December 2017, and had not significantly changed. Seismicity continued to fluctuate, though the number and magnitude of events had declined. Satellite data showed a decrease in thermal output reflective of a reduced lava flow rate. PVMBG warned that activity at Agung is still high and unstable; tiltmeter data showed low rates of inflation (GPS patterns were stable) and gas-emission data indicated magma movement at depth, though at a lower intensity compared to values measured at the end of November 2017. An event at 1149 on 13 February generated as ash plume that rose 1.5 km above the crater rim.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


24 January-30 January 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that white-and-gray plumes rose as high as 1 km above Agung’s crater rim during 24-25 January. Foggy conditions prevented visual observations of the crater during 26-30 January. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 6-km radius.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


17 January-23 January 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that the eruption at Agung continued during 17-23 January, with gas-and-steam plumes rising from the crater punctuated by occasional ash emissions. An event at 2126 on 17 January generated a plume that rose 1.5 km above the crater rim and drifted E. An event was recorded at 1944 on 18 January, though fog prevented confirmation of a plume. At 1920 on 19 January a Strombolian event produced an ash plume that rose as high as 2.5 km and drifted E, and ejected incandescent material as far as 1 km from the crater. Incandescence emanated from the crater for about two hours after the event. White-to-gray plumes rose 500 m during 22-23 January. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 6-km radius.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


10 January-16 January 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that during 10-16 January gray-and-white plumes generally rose as high as 500 m above Agung’s crater rim and drifted S, SE, and E. An event at 1754 on 11 January produced an ash plume that rose 2.5 km above the crater rim and drifted NE (likely causing ashfall in areas downwind), and another event at 0723 on 15 January generated an ash plume that rose 2 km. As of 11 January BNPB estimated that 53,207 evacuees were spread out in 233 shelters. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4) and the exclusion zone continued at a 6-km radius.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


3 January-9 January 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

BNPB reported that activity at Agung continued to fluctuate at a high level. Visual observations as well as seismic, deformation, and geochemistry data indicated that the eruption was continuing, though deformation data in recent days showed a stagnant trend. As of the morning of 4 January BNPB noted that there were 70,610 evacuees spread out in 240 shelters. The exclusion zone was adjusted to 6 km in all directions that same day, allowing thousands of displaced people the option to return to their homes. An estimated 17,115 people in seven villages have residences within the 6-km-radius exclusion zone.

PVMBG reported that during 3-9 January gray-and-white plumes rose as high as 2 km above the crater rim and drifted in multiple directions. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4).

Sources: Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB); Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


27 December-2 January 2018 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that during 27 December 2017-2 January 2018 gray-and-white plumes rose as high as 2 km above Agung’s crater rim and drifted W, SW, and E. Incandescence from the crater was often observed at night. Ash fell in several local villages including Badeg, Yeha, Temukus, Besakih (11 km WSW), and Muncan (12 km SW) on 1 January, and Rendang post on 2 January. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones continued at a general 8-km radius and 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


20 December-26 December 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that during 20-26 December gray-and-white plumes rose as high as 2 km above Agung’s crater rim and drifted W and E; weather clouds and fog sometimes prevented visual observations. Incandescence from the crater was sometimes observed at night. BNPB reported that during 22-23 December events generated dense gray ash plumes that rose as high as 2.5 km above the crater rim and drifted NE. Ash fell on the flanks and in Tulamben, Kubu. As of 25 December there were 71,045 evacuees spread out in 239 shelters. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones continued at a general 8-km radius and 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


13 December-19 December 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that during 13-19 December gray-and-white plumes rose as high as 2.5 km above Agung’s crater rim and drifted W, N, and E; weather clouds and fog sometimes prevented visual observations. Incandescence from the crater was sometimes observed at night. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones continued at a general 8-km radius and 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

BNPB posted two map-view images of Agung, one from 20 October showing pre-eruptive conditions and one from 16 December showing the lava that had erupted onto the crater floor, noting that about 1/3 of the crater had been filled with an estimated 20 million cubic meters of lava.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


6 December-12 December 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

Based on BNPB and PVMBG reports, the eruption at Agung continued during 6-12 December, with high seismicity and nighttime crater incandescence often visible. On 8 December at 0759 an event generated a dense ash plume that rose 2.1 km above the crater rim and drifted W. Minor amounts of ash were deposited on the flanks, and lapilli was reported in Temakung. An ash plume rose 3 km at 1457. The number of evacuees on 10 December was 70,079 (spread out in 237 shelters). Ash plumes rose as high as 2 km. Lahars were observed in a drainage originating on the flanks of Agung. An explosion at 0549 on 11 December generated a dense ash plume that rose 2.5 km and drifted W and NW. Multiple ash-plume events were observed during 11-12 December, with plumes rising 1.5 km above the crater rim. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones continued at a general 8-km radius and 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


29 November-5 December 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that the eruption at Agung, which began on 21 November, continued during 30 November-5 December. On 29 November gray ash plumes levels were rising to 2 km above the crater rim, resulting in ashfall to the SE. During 30 November-5 December emissions continued to rise 2 km; most were white in color, but dense gray ash emissions were noted during 1-2 December. Satellite data indicated that lava effusion continued at least through 1 December, and the erupted volume of lava was estimated to be 20 million cubic meters, equivalent to about a third of the total crater volume. The base of the plume was often reddish during 29 November-5 December reflecting incandescence from lava in the crater. BNPB noted on 5 December that 63,885 evacuees were distributed in 225 evacuation shelters.

Lahars were first noted on 21 November and continued to be observed through 5 December. The lahars flowed down drainages on the S flank (along the Tukad Yehsa, Tukad Sabuh, and Tukad Beliaung drainages) and also down the Tukad Bara drainage on the N flank, impacting houses, roads, and agricultural areas. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones continued at a general 8-km radius and 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


22 November-28 November 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that at 1730 on 25 November, after the number of volcanic earthquakes significantly increased, ash plumes rose 1.5 km above Agung’s crater rim and drifted 12 km WSW. Ashfall was reported in areas SW including Besakih (7 km SW), hamlets in the upper part of Pempatan (7.5 km W), and Temukus, prompting remaining residents to evacuate to the S. Eight inbound and 13 outbound international flights were cancelled, affecting 2,087 passengers. Crater incandescence was observed at 2100, signifying the presence of lava in the crater. BNPB noted that the number of evacuees was 25,016 (spread out in 224 shelters)

On 26 November dark gray ash plumes rose 2 km at 0505, 3 km at 0545, and 4 km at 0620, and drifted E and SE. Ash emissions continued throughout the day; a few explosions were heard within a 12-km radius. PVMBG issued a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation (VONA) elevating the Aviation Color Code from Orange to Red. Satellite data recorded sulfur dioxide gas concentrations ranging from 1,000 to 2,000 tons/day. Ashfall was reported in several areas downwind including North Duda (9 km S), Duda Timur (12 km S), Pempetan, Besakih, Sideman (15 km SSW), Tirta Abang, Sebudi (6 km SW), Amerta Bhuana (10 km SSW) in Klungkung, and some villages in Gianyar (20 km WSW). Ashfall was the thickest (5 mm) in Sibetan (11.5 km S). News sources noted that Lombok International Airport closed during 26-27 November.

PVMBG raised the Alert Level to 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) on 27 November, and the exclusion zones were expanded to a general 8-km radius and to 10 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions. Dense ash plumes continued to rise 2-4 km above the crater rim. Based on satellite data, the Darwin VAAC reported that ash plumes rose as high as 9.1 km (30,000 ft) a.s.l., or just over 6 km above the crater rim. Pictures and video showed a white steam plume adjacent to a gray ash plume rising form the crater, signifying two distinct active vents. According to news articles the Ngurah Rai International Airport in Bali closed due to the airborne ash. On 28 November BNPB noted that the number of evacuees had increased to 38,678, and were distributed in 225 evacuation centers. The Ngurah Rai International Airport reopened on 29 November, after the Aviation Color Code was lowered to Orange.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB); Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC); CNN; The Sun


15 November-21 November 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that a phreatic eruption at Agung began at 1705 on 21 November, following a low-frequency tremor signal. An ash plume rose 700 m above the crater rim and drifted ESE. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones remained intact (at 6 km, and an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions).

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


8 November-14 November 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that white plumes from Agung rose as high as 500 m above the crater rim during 8-14 November. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones remained intact (at 6 km, and an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


1 November-7 November 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that white plumes from Agung rose as high as 500 m above the crater rim during 1-7 November. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4), and the exclusion zones remained at 6 km, with an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


25 October-31 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

On 29 October PVMBG lowered the Alert level for Agung to 3 (on a scale of 1-4), noting a decline in activity, especially since 20 October. The thermal anomaly in the crater identified in satellite data was less intense in October than in September. Beginning on 20 October GPS data showed a slower deformation rate. Seismic signals decreased in number and amplitude, though low-frequency events continued to indicate magma movement. White fumarolic plumes rose as high as 500 m above the crater rim during 20-29 October; a comparison of video taken by drones on 20 and 29 October showed a relative decrease in the intensity of fumarolic emissions. BNPB stated that, despite the decreased Alert Level, the exclusion zones remained intact (at 6 km, and an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the NNE, SE, S, and SW directions). The number of evacuees was 133,457 (spread out in 385 shelters).

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


18 October-24 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that although foggy conditions at Agung occasionally prevented visual observations, during 18-24 October dense white plumes were seen rising as high as 500 m above the crater rim. Seismicity fluctuated but remained high, though BNPB reported that overall seismicity had decreased. According to BNPB a team launched a drone on 19 October and were able to capture video of the fumarolic emissions from several vents and cracks in the crater. The Alert Level remained at 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone at 9 km, and an additional expansion to 12 km in the SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


11 October-17 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

PVMBG reported that although foggy conditions at Agung sometimes prevented visual observations, during 11-17 October dense white plumes were seen rising 200 m above the crater rim. On 14 October BNPB stated that seismicity remained high; PVMBG noted that seismicity was dominated by shallow volcanic events, and the number of volcanic earthquakes remained steady. The governor of Bali extended the state of emergency to 26 October, noting that the Alert Level remained at 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4). The number of evacuees was 139,199 (spread out in 389 shelters).

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


4 October-10 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

On 5 October PVMBG reported that the rate of volcanic earthquakes at Agung had not increased during the previous 12 days, but continued to fluctuate at a high level. The seismic network detected 1-3 earthquakes per minute on average, with a total more than 600 events per day. The number of shallow volcanic earthquakes increased to 200 per day during 24 September-5 October, possibly indicating that magmatic activity at shallow depths was still high. The number of earthquakes felt by staff at the Mt. Agung Volcano Observatory in Rendang village, 12.5 km SSW, peaked on 27 September and then decreased afterwards. Gas plumes rose 50-200 m above the crater rim. Satellite data indicated an area of water expulsion near the solfatara field on the crater floor thought to reflect a disturbance to the hydrologic system in response to intruded magma at depth. On 5 October BNPB reported that the number of evacuees reached 146,797 (spread out in 427 shelters), though about 28 villages (70,000 people) were located within the evacuation zone. About 10,000 farm animals had also been evacuated. On 7 October a white plume likely composed mostly of water vapor rose 1.5 km above the crater rim and slowly drifted E. During 8-10 October fumarolic plumes rose 50-200 m above the rim. The Alert Level remained at 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone at 9 km, and an additional expansion to 12 km in the SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


27 September-3 October 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

On 29 September PVMBG reported that earthquakes at Agung were becoming stronger with more felt by local residents, and larger ones felt in areas 45-55 km SW including Denpasar and Kuta. Fumarolic emissions were identified in satellite data, as well as hot areas on the crater floor that had enlarged over the previous week. A new fracture on the crater floor emitted steam. After a M 4.2 earthquake was detected at 1627 on 26 September emissions intensified and rose 500 m above the crater rim. On 4 October BNPB reported that seismicity continued to fluctuate at high levels, and weak emissions rose above the crater rim. The number of evacuees reached 141,213 (spread out in 416 shelters) from 78 villages, though about 2,600 in locations outside of the evacuation zone were returning home; there were 28 villages (about 70,000 people) within the evacuation zone. The Alert Level remained at 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) with the exclusion zone at 9 km, and an additional expansion to 12 km in the SE, S, and SW directions.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB)


20 September-26 September 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

BNPB noted that as of 1300 on 22 September there were 9,421 people displaced from the evacuation zones at Agung. Seismicity continued to increase, therefore later that day on 22 September PVMBG raised the Alert Level to 4 (the highest level on a scale of 1-4) and expanded the exclusion zone to 9 km, with an additional expansion to 12 km in the SE, S, and SW directions. On 24 September BNPB reported that the number of evacuees continued to grow, as residents were leaving the expanded evacuation zones; there were 34,931 people in 238 shelters. The report noted that some people were returning home in the daytime to feed their livestock. On 27 September the number of evacuees reached 96,086 (spread out in 430 shelters), seismic activity continued to escalate, and diffuse white plumes rose 50 m above the crater rim.

Sources: Badan Nacional Penanggulangan Bencana (BNPB); Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


13 September-19 September 2017 Citation IconCite this Report

Increased seismicity at Agung, as well as the severity of past eruptions, prompted PVMBG to raise the Alert Level to 2 (on a scale of 1-4). The report noted that volcanic earthquakes (VA) began to be recorded on 10 August and shallow volcanic earthquakes (VB) began to be recorded on 24 August. Local tectonic earthquakes were also recorded and began to increase consistently on 26 August. PVMBG warned the public to stay at least 3 km away from the crater. On 13 September a climber observed a sulfatara plume rising from the bottom of the crater as high as 50 m above the crater rim. During 14-18 September four earthquakes centered around Agung were felt. On 18 September PVMBG reported that the number of VA and VB events continued to increase; the Alert Level was increased to 3. The exclusion zone was increased to 6 km, with an additional expansion to 7.5 km in the N, SE, and SSW directions. Elevations above 950 m were also restricted.

A VEI 5 eruption during 1963-64 produced pyroclastic flows and lahars that caused extensive damage and resulted in more than 1,100 deaths.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Agung.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History

There is data available for 4 confirmed Holocene eruptive periods.

2017 Nov 21 - 2019 Jun 13 Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 3

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode Summit crater
2017 Nov 21 - 2019 Jun 13 Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 2 Events for Episode 1 at Summit crater

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
2017 Nov 27    - - - - Ash Plume Based on satellite data, the Darwin VAAC reported that ash plumes rose as high as 9.1 km or just over 6 km above the crater rim.
2017 Nov 27    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index) VEI 3

1963 Feb 18 - 1964 Jan 27 Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 5

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode
1963 Feb 18 - 1964 Jan 27 Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 24 Events for Episode 1

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
   - - - -    - - - - Eruption cloud
   - - - -    - - - - Ash violent, strong, or large
   - - - -    - - - - Lapilli
   - - - -    - - - - Bombs
   - - - -    - - - - Flames
   - - - -    - - - - Audible Sounds
   - - - -    - - - - Lightning
   - - - -    - - - - Earthquakes (undefined) Before.
   - - - -    - - - - Volcanic tremor
   - - - -    - - - - Property Damage
   - - - -    - - - - Evacuations
1963 Feb 18    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)
1963 Feb 19    - - - - Lava flow Andesite through a notch on N rim
1963 Feb 19    - - - - Avalanche Lava front collapse
1963 Feb 20    - - - - Pyroclastic flow Reached Siligading village on N slope
1963 Feb 25 ± 3 days    - - - - Lahar or Mudflow Remobilized PF's
1963 Mar 17    - - - - Explosion First major explosion; est >20 km altitude plume
1963 Mar 17
(in or after)
   - - - - Fatalities
1963 Mar 17    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)
1963 May 16    - - - - Explosion Second major explosion; est >20 km altitude plume
1963 May 16    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)
1963 May 31    - - - - Explosion 9 km plume from multiple explosions
1963 Jun 14    - - - - Explosion 3 km plume, PF
1963 Oct 22    - - - - Explosion 4 km plume, PF

1843 Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 5

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode
1843 - Unknown Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 5 Events for Episode 1

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
   - - - -    - - - - Explosion
   - - - -    - - - - Ash
   - - - -    - - - - Blocks
   - - - -    - - - - Earthquakes (undefined)
1843    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)

[ 1821 Mar 16 ] Uncertain Eruption

1808 Confirmed Eruption Max VEI: 2

Episode 1 | Eruption Episode
1808 - Unknown Evidence from Observations: Reported

List of 2 Events for Episode 1

Start Date End Date Event Type Event Remarks
   - - - -    - - - - Explosion
1808    - - - - VEI (Explosivity Index)
Deformation History

There is data available for 1 deformation periods. Expand each entry for additional details.


Deformation during 2006 - 2009 [Uplift; Observed by InSAR]

Start Date: 2006 Stop Date: 2009 Direction: Uplift Method: InSAR
Magnitude: Unknown Spatial Extent: Unknown Latitude: Unknown Longitude: Unknown

Remarks: Shallow-sourced inflation at Agung has so far not resulted in eruption.

Figure (see Caption)

Averaged 2006?2009 LOS velocity map of the west Sunda volcanic arc, Indonesia, from ALOS InSAR time series, overlaying SRTM V4 DEM. Only pixels with a temporal coherence larger than 0.6 are shown. Black arrows: relative plate convergence rates at the Sunda trench (red line). Insets: zoom into 7 deforming volcanic centers, upper left: inflating volcanoes, lower right: deflating volcano.

From: Chaussard and Amelung 2012.


Reference List: Chaussard and Amelung 2012.

Full References:

Chaussard E, Amelung F, 2012. Precursory inflation of shallow magma reservoirs at west Sunda volcanoes detected by InSAR. Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L21311. https://doi.org/10.1029/2012GL053817

Emission History

There is no Emissions History data available for Agung.

Photo Gallery

This view from the NW rim of the massive 10 x 13 km outer caldera of Batur volcano looks across the caldera to Gunung Abang (center) on the SE caldera rim. Lake Batur (right) banks against the SE wall of the outer caldera and overlies the rim of the 7.5-km-wide inner caldera. Historically active Gunung Batur stratovolcano (left-center) was constructed along a NE-SW-trending line in the center of the inner caldera of Batur volcano. The large stratovolcano in the distance is Gunung Agung, Bali's highest volcano.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1971.
Agung volcano towers over the eastern end of the island of Bali. A steep-walled, 200-m deep crater is located at the summit of the 3142-m-high volcano. Only three eruptions have been recorded in historical time; the latest, in 1963-64, produced devastating pyroclastic flows and lahars.

Copyrighted photo by Katia and Maurice Krafft, 1971.
An ash plume towers above Bali's Agung volcano on 12 March 1963. Five days later a devastating eruption produced pyroclastic flows and lahars that killed 1,148 people. Another powerful eruption on 16 May caused additional fatalities. The eruption left tens of thousands homeless.

Photo by K. Kusumadinata, 1963 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
An ash plume rises above the summit crater of Agung volcano on 17 March 1963 during the first of two powerful explosive eruptions that caused much devastation to the island of Bali. The eruption began on 19 February with a lava flow that traveled down the N flank. Major explosive events occurred on 17 March and 16 May that produced devastating pyroclastic flows and lahars that killed more than 1,100 people.

Photo by Djazuli, 1963 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
The summit of Bali's Gunung Agung contains a 500-m-wide, 200-m-deep crater that is the source of the historical eruptions. Gray lava flows and brown tephra layers from explosive eruptions are exposed in the crater wall.

Photo by Sumarna Hamidi, 1973 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
The summit of Agung marks the highest point on the island of Bali. The broad irregular massif in the far distance is the 11 x 6 km wide Bratan caldera.

Photo by Sumarma Hamidi, 1973 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
Agung is located at the eastern end of the island of Bali. A 200-m-deep crater is located at the summit of the volcano, seen here from the Sakta River on the eastern flank. Eruptions have been recorded in historical time including an episode during 1963-64 that produced devastating pyroclastic flows and lahars.

Photo by Tom Pierson, 1989 (U.S. Geological Survey).
Gunung Agung towers above rice fields near the Rendang volcano observation post. The stratovolcano has erupted infrequently during historical time, but its 1963 eruption was one of the most devastating in Indonesia during the 20th century.

Photo by M.E. Ilyas, 1991 (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).
GVP Map Holdings

The maps shown below have been scanned from the GVP map archives and include the volcano on this page. Clicking on the small images will load the full 300 dpi map. Very small-scale maps (such as world maps) are not included. The maps database originated over 30 years ago, but was only recently updated and connected to our main database. We welcome users to tell us if they see incorrect information or other problems with the maps; please use the Contact GVP link at the bottom of the page to send us email.


Title: Australia, Indonesia
Publisher: DMA & Defence Department, AIS, Melbourne,Australia
Country: Indon, Australia
Year: 1980
Series: ONC
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Australia, Indonesia

Title: Geology of Australia
Publisher: BMR, Geology & Geophysics, Dept Natural Resources
Country: Australia
Year: 1976
Map Type: Geology
Scale: 1:2,500,000
Map of Geology of Australia

Title: Geological Map Bali
Publisher: Geological Survey of Indonesia
Country: Indonesia
Year: 1971
Map Type: Geology
Scale: 1:250,000
Map of Geological Map Bali

Title: Denpasar
Publisher: Director of Military Survey, UK
Country: Indonesia
Year: 1967
Series: 1501 (G)
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:250,000
Map of Denpasar

Title: Bondowoso
Publisher: Director of Military Survey, UK
Country: Indonesia
Year: 1966
Series: 1501 (A)
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:250,000
Map of Bondowoso

Title: Singaradja
Publisher: US Army Map Service (29th Engineer Battalion)
Country: Indonesia
Year: 1965
Series: T725
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:50,000
Map of Singaradja

Title: Bondowoso
Publisher: US Army Corps of Engineers
Country: Indonesia
Year: 1959
Series: T503
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:250,000
Map of Bondowoso

Title: Singaradja
Publisher: US Army Corps of Engineers
Country: Indonesia
Year: 1959
Series: T503
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:250,000
Map of Singaradja

Title: Singaradja
Publisher: US Army Corps of Engineers
Country: Indonesia
Year: 1945
Series: T521
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:250,000
Map of Singaradja

Title: Singaradja
Publisher: US Army Map Service
Country: Indonesia
Year: 1945
Series: AMS
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Singaradja

Title: Makassar
Publisher: US Army Map Service
Country: Indonesia
Year: 1944
Series: AMS
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Makassar
Smithsonian Sample Collections Database

The following 7 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections, and may be availble for research (contact the Rock and Ore Collections Manager). Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description Lava Source Collection Date
NMNH 116957-1 Scoria -- 1 Oct 1979
NMNH 116957-2 Scoria -- 1 Oct 1979
NMNH 116957-3 Lava -- --
NMNH 117584-1 Andesite -- --
NMNH 117584-2 Andesite -- --
NMNH 117584-3 Ash -- --
NMNH 117584-4 Andesite -- --
External Sites