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Kamen

Photo of this volcano
  • Russia
  • Kamchatka and Mainland Asia
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown - Evidence Credible
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 56.02°N
  • 160.593°E

  • 4585 m
    15043 ft

  • 300251
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Kamen.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Kamen.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Kamen.

The Global Volcanism Program has no synonyms or subfeatures listed for Kamen.

Eruptive History

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Kamen. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Kamen page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

Deformation History

There is no Deformation History data available for Kamen.

Emission History

There is no Emissions History data available for Kamen.

Photo Gallery

This dramatic photo looks north along the cluster of large stratovolcanoes forming the Kliuchevskaya volcano group. Udina volcano (foreground) and the twin Zimina volcano (middle right) are Holocene centers without historical eruptions. Kamen volcano (top center) and Kliuchevskoi (top right) are Kamchatka's two highest peaks. Ushkovsky volcano (top left) lies at the NW end of the volcano group and has had a single historical eruption. Bezymianny volcano is hidden by clouds below Kamen.

Photo by Oleg Volynets (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
Four volcanoes of the Kliuchevskaya volcano group are visible in this north-looking view. Steam clouds pour from the summit of Bezymianny volcano (foreground), which is dwarfed by sharp-peaked Kamen volcano behind it. Kliuchevskoi volcano, the highest and one of the most active volcanoes of Kamchatka, is at the upper right. The compound Ushkovsky volcano is on the left horizon, with Krestovsky forming the rounded summit and the glacier-covered Ushkovsky caldera visible at the extreme left.

Photo by Oleg Volynets (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
Steam clouds rise from the summit lava dome of Bezymianny volcano in September 1990. This view from the south shows steep-sided Kamen volcano, the 2nd-highest peak on the Kamchatka Peninsula, at the right. The smooth, snow-mantled slopes at the left are the outer flanks of the pre-1956 Bezymianny volcano. Collapse of the summit during a catastrophic eruption that year produced a large horseshoe-shaped crater that has subsequently been largely filled by growth of the lava dome.

Photo by Dan Miller, 1990 (U.S. Geological Survey).
See title for photo information.
Kamen volcano, seen here from the NE, is a steep-sided stratovolcano of largely Pleistocene age that rises immediately to the north of frequently active Bezymianny volcano (left). The summit of Kamen collapsed about 1200-1300 years ago, producing a massive debris avalanche that swept to the east, and leaving the steep escarpment that forms the east face of the volcano.

Photo by E.Y. Zhdanova (courtesy of Oleg Volynets, Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
Rugged Kamen volcano towers above a volcanological field station on the flank of Bezymianny volcano. The steep ridge in the center of the photo is the southern rim of a scarp created by a massive volcanic landslide about 1200-1300 years ago. Collapse of the summit created a massive debris avalanche that swept more than 30 km to the east. The sheer landslide headwall soars 3 km above its base.

Photo by Yuri Doubik (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
Lava pours from a vent on the SE flank of Kliuchevskoi volcano in 1988 with the sharp spire of Kamen volcano in the background. During long-term activity at Kliuchevskoi from November 1986 to September 1990, both explosive eruptions and lava effusion took place from vents at the summit and on the NE, SE, SW, and eastern flanks. The greatly oversteepened east flank of Kamen volcano resulted from collapse of the summit about 1200-1300 years ago, which produced a massive debris avalanche.

Photo courtesy of Anatolii Khrenov, 1988 (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
An ash plume rises above the summit of Kliuchevskoi volcano on February 16, 1987. This was part of a long-term eruption during 1986-1990 that included explosive and effusive activity from both summit and flank vents. This dramatic view from the south shows steaming Bezymianny volcano, itself in eruption at this time, at the lower left, sharp-peaked Kamen volcano at the left center, and the broad peak of Ushkovsky volcano on the left horizon.

Photo by Alexander Belousov, 1987 (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
Clouds drape the margins of the glacier-covered summit caldera of Ushkovsky (Plosky) volcano in the foreground. The two highest volcanoes in Kamchatka, Kliuchevskoi (left) and Kamen (right) rise above the layer of clouds to the SE. A small ash plume drifts above the summit of Kliuchevskoi, one of Kamchatka's most active volcanoes. No historical eruptions have occurred from the erosionally dissected Kamen volcano, while a single historical eruption, during 1890, has been documented from Ushkovsky volcano.

Photo by Yuri Doubik (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
Kamchatka's two highest volcanoes rise above a sea of clouds. Their greatly differing morphologies reflect contrasting geologic histories. Construction of extensively eroded Kamen volcano (left) took place during the Pleistocene. It has been relatively inactive since. Its eastern (right) side was removed by a massive landslide about 1200-1300 years ago, leaving the steep escarpment. Symmetrical Kliuchevskoi, in contrast, is one of Kamchatka's youngest and most active volcanoes.

Photo by Yuri Doubik (Institute of Volcanology, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
Kamen (left), Kliuchevskoi (right), and the broad snow-capped Ushkovsky volcano behind them to the west, anchor the northern end of the Kliuchevskaya volcano group. Ushkovsky consists of the flat-topped Ushkovsky volcano (Daljny Plosky) on the left, which is capped by an ice-filled 4.5 x 5.5 km caldera, and the adjacent slightly higher peak of Krestovsky (Blizhny Plosky) volcano on the right. Kamen and Kliuchevskoi are the two highest peaks in Kamchatka and Kliuchevskoi is also one of its most active volcanoes.

Photo by Phil Kyle, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 1996 (courtesy of Vera Ponomareva, IUGG, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
The steep-sided Kamen stratovolcano lies at the center of a N-S-trending chain of volcanoes, flanked by Bezymianny (left) and Kliuchevskoi. The sharp-peaked, 4585-m-high Kamen is Kamchatka's second highest volcano, topped only by its neighbor Kliuchevskoi. Kamen formed during the late Pleistocene, but activity continued into the Holocene. A major slope failure about 1200-1300 years ago removed much of the eastern side of the volcano, leaving the steep escarpment seen in this view.

Photo by Vera Ponomareva, 1975 (Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
Kamen volcano towers above the Kharpinsky cinder cone (left) near the Aphonchich seismic station on the ESE flank of Kliuchevskoi volcano. Lahar deposits from Kliuchevskoi volcano cover the foreground. The eastern side of Kamen was removed by a massive volcanic landslide about 1200-1300 years ago.

Photo by Vera Ponomareva, 1975 (Institute of Volcanic Geology and Geochemistry, Petropavlovsk).
See title for photo information.
GVP Map Holdings

The maps shown below have been scanned from the GVP map archives and include the volcano on this page. Clicking on the small images will load the full 300 dpi map. Very small-scale maps (such as world maps) are not included. The maps database originated over 30 years ago, but was only recently updated and connected to our main database. We welcome users to tell us if they see incorrect information or other problems with the maps; please use the Contact GVP link at the bottom of the page to send us email.


Title: Palana (in Russian)
Publisher: P O Dalazyerogeodezya (publishing co.)
Country: Kamchatka
Year: 1990
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Palana (in Russian)

Title: Klyuchi (in Russian)
Publisher: Soviet Army ?
Country: Kamchatka
Year: 1987
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:500,000
Map of Klyuchi (in Russian)

Title: RFSFR, USSR (Kamchatka Peninsula N)
Publisher: DMA
Country: USSR
Year: 1987
Series: TPC
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:500,000
Map of RFSFR, USSR (Kamchatka Peninsula N)

Title: USSR (Kamchatka S)
Publisher: DMA
Country: USSR
Year: 1987
Series: TPC
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:500,000
Map of USSR (Kamchatka S)

Title: USSR
Publisher: DMA
Country: Kuril-I
Year: 1987
Series: TPC
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:500,000
Map of USSR

Title: Kamchatsky Peninsula Topo Map
Country: USSR
Year: 1986
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:2,500,000
Map of Kamchatsky Peninsula Topo Map

Title: Kluichi
Country: USSR
Year: 1980
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:500,000
Map of Kluichi

Title: Zhupanovo (in Russian)
Publisher: Soviet Army ?
Country: Kamchatka
Year: 1980
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:500,000
Map of Zhupanovo (in Russian)

Title: Zhupanovo
Country: USSR
Year: 1962
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:500,000
Map of Zhupanovo

Title: Petropavlosk-Kamchatskiy
Publisher: US Army Map Service
Country: USSR
Year: 1959
Series: AMS
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Petropavlosk-Kamchatskiy

Title: Vulk. Tolbachinski
Country: USSR
Year: 1953
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:200,000
Map of Vulk. Tolbachinski

Title: Kliuchi
Country: USSR
Year: 1953
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:200,000
Map of Kliuchi

Title: Voyampolka
Publisher: US Army Map Service
Country: USSR
Year: 1944
Series: AMS
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Voyampolka
Smithsonian Sample Collections Database

There are no samples for Kamen in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences Rock and Ore collection.

External Sites