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China Volcanoes

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    Wudalianchi

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    Changbaishan

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    Changbaishan

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    Wudalianchi

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    Arxan-Chaihe

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    Arxan-Chaihe

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    Tengchong

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    Wudalianchi

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    Honggeertu

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    Honggeertu

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    Changbaishan

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    Longgang Group

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    Wudalianchi

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    Tengchong

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China has 10 Holocene volcanoes. Note that as a scientific organization we provide these listings for informational purposes only, with no international legal or policy implications. Volcanoes will be included on this list if they are within the boundaries of a country, on a shared boundary or area, in a remote territory, or within a maritime Exclusive Economic Zone. Bolded volcanoes have erupted within the past 20 years. Suggestions and data updates are always welcome ().

Volcano Name Location Last Eruption Primary Volcano Type
Arxan-Chaihe China (eastern) 0 CE Volcanic field
Ashikule Volcanic Field China (western) 1951 CE Volcanic field
Changbaishan China-Korea border 1903 CE Stratovolcano
Hainan Volcanic Field Southern China 1933 CE Volcanic field
Honggeertu China (eastern) Unknown - Evidence Uncertain Volcanic field
Jingpohu Heilongjiang Province 520 BCE Volcanic field
Keluo Group Heilongjiang Province Unknown - Evidence Credible Volcanic field
Longgang Group Jilin Province 350 CE Volcanic field
Tengchong Southern China 5750 BCE Volcanic field
Wudalianchi Heilongjiang Province 1776 CE Volcanic field

Chronological listing of known Holocene eruptions (confirmed or uncertain) from volcanoes in China. Bolded eruptions indicate continuing activity.

Volcano Name Start Date Stop Date Certainty VEI Evidence
Ashikule Volcanic Field 1951 May 27 Unknown Confirmed 2 Observations: Reported
Hainan Volcanic Field 1933 Jun 26 ± 4 days 1933 Jul 8 (in or after) Confirmed   Observations: Reported
Changbaishan 1903 Apr 15 ± 45 days Unknown Confirmed   Observations: Reported
Changbaishan 1898 Unknown Confirmed 2 Observations: Reported
Hainan Volcanic Field 1883 Unknown Confirmed   Observations: Reported
Ashikule Volcanic Field [1850 ± 50 years] [Unknown] Uncertain  
Wudalianchi 1776 Unknown Confirmed 2 Observations: Reported
Wudalianchi 1720 Jan 14 1721 Jun Confirmed 3 Observations: Reported
Changbaishan 1702 Jun 9 Unknown Confirmed   Observations: Reported
Changbaishan 1668 Jun Unknown Confirmed   Observations: Reported
Tengchong [1609] [Unknown] Uncertain  
Changbaishan [1597 Oct 6] [Unknown] Uncertain  
Changbaishan [1413] [Unknown] Uncertain  
Changbaishan 0946 Nov 15 ± 45 days Unknown Confirmed 6 Isotopic: 14C (calibrated)
Longgang Group 0350 (?) Unknown Confirmed   Isotopic: 14C (uncalibrated)
Arxan-Chaihe 0000 ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Isotopic: 14C (uncalibrated)
Changbaishan 0180 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Isotopic: 14C (uncalibrated)
Jingpohu 0520 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Isotopic: 14C (uncalibrated)
Changbaishan [1000 BCE (?)] [Unknown] Uncertain  
Jingpohu 1540 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed   Isotopic: 14C (uncalibrated)
Changbaishan 2160 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Isotopic: 14C (uncalibrated)
Jingpohu 3550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Isotopic: 14C (uncalibrated)
Tengchong 5750 BCE ± 1000 years Unknown Confirmed   Isotopic: Uranium-series

China has 27 Pleistocene volcanoes. Note that as a scientific organization we provide these listings for informational purposes only, with no international legal or policy implications. Volcanoes will be included on this list if they are within the boundaries of a country, on a shared boundary or area, in a remote territory, or within a maritime Exclusive Economic Zone. Suggestions and data updates are always welcome ().

Volcano Name Location Primary Volcano Type
Chifeng China (eastern) Unknown
Dalainuoer China (eastern) Pyroclastic cone(s)
Datong-Fengzen China (eastern) Volcanic field
Dunhua China (eastern) Unknown
Erkeshan China (eastern) Pyroclastic cone(s)
Fanjiatung Group China (eastern) Cone(s)
Gaojianshi China Sea Unknown
Heibei Plain China (eastern) Unknown
Huixian China (eastern) Unknown
Jianghui Group China (eastern) Pyroclastic cone
Jianshan China (eastern) Shield
Kuandian China (eastern) Pyroclastic cone(s)
Leizhou Bandao Southeastern China Volcanic field
Longhai China (eastern) Unknown
Nuomin China (eastern) Pyroclastic cone(s)
Nushan China (eastern) Cone
Taihangshanlu China (eastern) Unknown
Tangy'n China (eastern) Unknown
Unnamed China (eastern) Unknown
Unnamed China (eastern) Unknown
Unnamed China (eastern) Unknown
Unnamed China (western) Volcanic field
Unnamed China (western) Unknown
Unnamed China (eastern) Unknown
Weizhoudao Southeast Asia Shield
Yichuan China (eastern) Volcanic field
Yitong Group China (eastern) Lava dome(s)

There are 16 photos available for volcanoes in China.

The Leizhou Bandao volcanic field covers much of the southern (orange-brown colored) part of the Leizhou Peninsula, across the Qiongzhou strait north of Hainan Dao Island (bottom). Leizhou Bandao is the northern part of the Qionglei volcano group, a 7300 sq km basaltic-to-basanitic plateau that covers the southern Leizhou (Liuchow) Peninsula and extends across a broad area of northern Hainan Dao. Another area of Pleistocene-Holocene volcanism lies at the greenish area at the northern end of the peninsula, west of Zhanjiang City.

NASA Landsat 7 image (worldwind.arc.nasa.gov)
Water draining from Tianchi lake plunges over a mid-Pleistocene trachytic lava flow near the caldera rim on the upper N flank of Changbaishan (Baitoushan) volcano.

Photo by Xiang Lui, 1983 (Changchun University).
The Pleistocene Nangelaqiushan scoria cone contains a 500-m-wide flat-bottomed crater, is one of many cones forming the Wudalianchi volcanic field in Manchuria, NE China. The cones show a preferred alignment along three parallel NE-SW trends. The Wudalianchi volcanic field was named for five scenic lakes dammed by lava flows during a 1719-21 eruption, which formed two new scoria cones and produced a 65 km2 lava field.

Photo courtesy of Jim Whitford-Stark, Sul Ross State University, Texas (published in Feng et al., 1979).
The Kunlun Volcanic Group in NW Tibet contains at least 70 cones. The cone just above the center of this image is the Ashi cone, which erupted lava across 33 km2 in 1951. Other cones are visible in the Ashikule Basin, the relatively flat area across this image.

Satellite image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc., 2019 (https://www.planet.com/).
Several cones of the Keluo Group are shown in this September 2019 Planet Labs satellite image monthly mosaic (N is at the top; this image is approximately 22 km across). The volcanic field is located in NE China, and is NW of the Wudalianchi volcanic field.

Satellite image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc., 2018 (https://www.planet.com/).
Two of the many scoria cones of the Tengchong Volcanic Field rise above cultivated lands in southern China near the border of Myanmar. Volcanism in this 600 km2 volcanic field took place during five periods ranging from the early Pliocene to the late Holocene. An explosive eruption took place at the northern cone of Dayingshan in 1609. The area is the site of active geothermal fields.

Photo by Liu Xiang, 1995 (Changchun University).
Several cones and craters of the Honggeertu volcanic field in the Nei Mongol Province are shown across this August 2019 Planet Labs satellite image monthly mosaic (N is at the top; this image is approximately 11 km across). The cones are across a NE-SW trend and several have summit craters up to 200 m in diameter.

Satellite image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc., 2019 (https://www.planet.com/).
The Arxan-Chaihe volcanic field covers around 2,000 km2 with at least 47 identified vents, some of which can be seen in a NE-SW trend through the center of this September 2019 Planet Labs satellite image monthly mosaic (N is at the top; this image is approximately 69 km across). As well as eruptions producing spatter cones and lava flows, there are phreatomagmatic vents and fissure-controlled vents.

Satellite image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc., 2018 (https://www.planet.com/).
Recent lava flows surround the Laoheishan scoria cone, one of which formed during 1719-21. Four radial fissures, two of which are seen in this view from the north, were the source of most of the 1719-21 Shilong lava flows, which cover a 65 km2 area surrounding Laoheishan and the Huoshaoshan scoria cone to the NE. The dominantly pahoehoe lava flows, many of which were tube-fed, blocked local drainages and formed several small lakes at the eastern and northern margins of the lava field.

Photo courtesy of Jim Whitford-Stark, Sul Ross State University, Texas (published in Feng et al., 1979).
Laoheishan is one of two scoria cones that formed during the 1719-21 eruption of the Wudalianchi volcanic field and contains a 350-m-wide, 145-m-deep summit crater. A smaller vegetated crater on the NE flank can be seen to the lower left. Laoheishan formed a large portion of an extensive lava field that surrounds it and Huoshaoshan, the other scoria cone that formed during the eruption.

Photo courtesy of Jim Whitford-Stark, Sul Ross State University, Texas (published in Feng et al., 1979).
A geologist stands at the rim of a crater in the Tengchong Volcanic Field, with Ailuo Mountain in the background to the W. The youngest eruptions from the Tengchong field, which surrounds the city of Tengchong, produced olivine basalts and basaltic andesites.

Photo by Liu Xiang, 1995 (Changchun University).
A portion of the Arxan-Chaihe volcanic field spanning approximately 32 km across is shown in this September 2018 Planet Labs satellite image monthly mosaic (N is at the top; this image is approximately 32 km across). There is a NE-SW trend of scoria cones, craters, and maars across the image, including Aershan just north of Tianchizhen town (in the western side of the image), the smaller Dichi lake to the E, the larger Shihaopendi complex crater near the center of this image, and Yanshan and Gaoshan NE of there.

Satellite image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc., 2018 (https://www.planet.com/).
The Leizhou Bandao volcanic field covers much of the southern part of the Leizhou Peninsula. The field contains many scoria cones, with some in the area shown in this December 2020 Planet Labs satellite image monthly mosaic (N is at the top; this image is approximately 23 km across). The field is the northern portion of the Qionglei volcano group.

Satellite image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc., 2020 (https://www.planet.com/).
Lake Tianchi occupies the 5-km-wide, 850-m-deep summit caldera of Changbaishan, which straddles the China/Korea border. The volcano is also known as Baitoushan and by the Korean names of Baegdu or P'aektu-san. This view looks from the northern rim on the Chinese side towards the SE caldera wall on the Korean side. One of the world's largest known Holocene explosive eruptions took place from Changbaishan about 1000 CE, depositing tephra as far away as northern Japan.

Photo by Xiang Liu, 1983 (Changchun University).
The Hainan Volcanic Field in China contains around 58 identified cones, craters, and maars, some of which are visible in this November 2020 Planet Labs satellite image monthly mosaic (N is at the top; this image is approximately 14 km across). The Leihuling cone with a roughly 300-m-diameter crater is to the SW of the S21 Zhongxian expressway that runs through the center of the image.

Satellite image courtesy of Planet Labs Inc., 2020 (https://www.planet.com/).
Sanjiaolongwan is a 1-km-wide early Pleistocene maar of the Longgang volcanic field. This massive volcanic field covers 1,700 km2 in the Jilin Province of NE China, west of Changbaishan volcano, and contains lava flows, more than 150 Quaternary scoria cones, and tuff rings.

Photo by Xiang Liu, 1983 (Changchun University).

This is a compilation of China volcano information sources, such as official monitoring or other government agencies.

Volcano Observatories
Chinese Earthquake Authority