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Report on Tenerife (Spain) — 12 May-18 May 2004

Smithsonian / US Geological Survey Weekly Volcanic Activity Report, 12 May-18 May 2004
Managing Editor: Gari Mayberry

Please cite this report as:

Global Volcanism Program, 2004. Report on Tenerife (Spain). In: Mayberry, G (ed.), Weekly Volcanic Activity Report, 12 May-18 May 2004. Smithsonian Institution and US Geological Survey.

Volcano Profile |  Weekly Report (12 May-18 May 2004)


Tenerife

Spain

28.271°N, 16.641°W; summit elev. 3715 m

All times are local (unless otherwise noted)


Local volcanologists reported that there was increased seismicity at Tenerife in mid-May, according to a news article. The article stated that during several days before 18 May there were "five successive low-intensity earthquakes in the island's most volcanically active zone in the area between Mont Teide and Santiago del Teide." The director of the Estación Vulcanológica de Canarias stated that the earthquakes, which were less than M 2, could be an early sign that something unusual was happening at the volcano.

Geologic Background. The large triangular island of Tenerife is composed of a complex of overlapping Miocene-to-Quaternary stratovolcanoes that have remained active into historical time. The NE-trending Cordillera Dorsal volcanic massif joins the Las Cañadas volcano on the SW side of Tenerife with older volcanoes, creating the largest volcanic complex of the Canary Islands. Controversy surrounds the formation of the dramatic 10 x 17 km Las Cañadas caldera, which is partially filled by Teide stratovolcano, the highest peak in the Atlantic Ocean. The origin of the caldera has been variably considered to be due to collapse following multiple major explosive eruptions or as a result of a massive landslide (in a manner similar to the earlier formation of the massive La Orotava and Guimar valleys), or a combination of the two processes. The most recent stage of activity beginning in the late Pleistocene included the construction of the Pico Viejo and Teide edifices. Tenerife was perhaps observed in eruption by Christopher Columbus, and several flank vents on the Canary Island's most active volcano have been active during historical time.

Source: Yorkshire Post Today News