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Newberry

Photo of this volcano
  • United States
  • Canada and Western USA
  • Shield
  • 690 CE
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 43.722°N
  • 121.229°W

  • 2434 m
    7986 ft

  • 322110
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Newberry.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Newberry.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Newberry.

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.

Eruptive History

There is data available for 11 Holocene eruptive periods.

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0690 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected) S caldera wall, Big Obsidian Flow
0490 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed 4 Radiocarbon (corrected) South caldera wall
1450 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Hydration Rind South of East Lake
4450 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Hydration Rind Center, N & S caldera, upper SE flank, Central Pumice Cone, Game Hut Obsidian
4690 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone, Lava Cascade flow
4770 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Sugarpine Butte)
4860 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone, Forest Road flow
4960 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) East Lake fissure, south flank
5070 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected) Lower NW rift zone (Lava Butte)
5260 BCE ± 150 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Radiocarbon (corrected) NW rift zone (Lava Cast Forest)
9210 BCE ± 1200 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) South and east caldera rim
Deformation History

There is no Deformation History data available for Newberry.

Emission History

There is no Emissions History data available for Newberry.

Photo Gallery

Paulina Lake is the westernmost of two lakes within Newberry caldera and is seen here from Paulina Peak, the high point of the southern caldera rim. The lava flow entering the lake to the upper right erupted about 6,400 years ago from the Central Pumice Cone. The flow split into two lobes, and the other lobe traveled into East Lake, just out of view to the right. This was one of several eruptive vents within the caldera that were active during this eruptive phase.

Photo by Willie Scott, 1974 (U.S. Geological Survey).
Newberry shield volcano covers an area of about 1,600 km2 about 60 km E of the crest of the Cascade Range in central Oregon. The low-angle shield volcano covers an area of 60 km in a N-S direction and 30 km E-W. More than 400 scoria cones dot the flanks of the volcano, including Lava Butte at the left center of this photo, one of many cones formed around 6,100 years ago along the NW rift zone.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1995 (Smithsonian Institution).
The crater rim of Lava Butte scoria cone on the NW flank provides a view of the broad Newberry shield volcano. Many other NW flank cones and associated lava flows erupted about the same time as the Lava Butte cone and lava flow. Over the past 7,700 years Newberry has erupted both mafic and silicic lavas from flank vents and within the caldera, respectively.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1981 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Big Obsidian Flow erupted from Newberry caldera in central Oregon is composed of glassy rhyolite, formed when lava rapidly cools. The flow covers 20 km2 of the caldera floor. Obsidian flows are never entirely glassy, but also contain large amounts of frothy pumiceous material and devitrified (crystallized) spherulites, which commonly form bands alternating with layers of glass.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1981 (Smithsonian Institution).
As many as 400 scoria cones that dot the flanks of the massive 30 x 60 km wide Newberry shield volcano in Oregon are seen in this view from Paulina Peak on the south rim of Newberry caldera. The scoria cones at Newberry are most abundant on the north and south flanks. Many are of Pleistocene age, but cones along a rift on the NW flank and some on the south flank have erupted during the Holocene.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1972 (Smithsonian Institution).
A major eruption about 6,400 years ago produced the large Central Pumice Cone in the center of Newberry caldera, a pumice ring, and obsidian lava flows. The Interlake obsidian flow (on the far side of the left-hand lake, Paulina) originated from a vent on the north caldera wall and flowed onto the caldera floor and divided around Central Pumice Cone. The west lobe (seen here) flowed into Paulina Lake, while the east lobe flowed behind Central Pumice Cone into East Lake. The Game Hut obsidian flow was also erupted at this time.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1984 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Central Pumice Cone at the right formed during a major rhyolitic eruption about 6,400 years ago. Many other vents on the north and south caldera walls and the caldera floor were also active at this time, producing pumice rings and obsidian flows. Paulina Peak forms the high point on the south caldera rim at the left.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1984 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Big Obsidian Flow lava flow in the foreground covers about 2.6 km2 of the floor of Newberry caldera and was emplaced about 1,300 years ago. The eruption occurred at a vent at the base of the southern caldera wall, out of view to the right.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1984 (Smithsonian Institution).
Lava Butte is a scoria cone on the NW flank of Newberry volcano at the end of fissure system that extended from the caldera rim about 7,000 years ago. Following construction of the cone, the SW flank fissure at the base of the cone (in the foreground) fed a voluminous lava flow that traveled to the north and changed the course of the Deschutes River.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1981 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Lava Cast Forest lava flow on the NW flank of Newberry formed about 7,000 years ago. It contains hollow tree molds that stand above the surface of the flow. These features formed when flowing lava chilled around standing tree trunks that subsequently burned from the heat of the lava. Horizontal tree molds formed around trees that had either previously fallen or were toppled by the advancing lava flow.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1972 (Smithsonian Institution).
This is the NE margin of the Big Obsidian Flow, which erupted from a vent near the Newberry southern caldera wall about 1,300 years ago into this crater, whose forested rim is seen in the background.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1981 (Smithsonian Institution).
The East Lake Fissure (center) cutting through the northern rim of Newberry caldera is part of the northwest rift zone. The basaltic lava flow (the unvegetated area in the center of the photo) can be seen descending into the NE corner of East Lake.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1997 (Smithsonian Institution).
The East Lake obsidian flows and associated pumice deposits erupted from fissures parallel to the inner caldera wall. The westernmost of the two obsidian flows immediately south of East Lake is seen here. It traveled to the north towards East Lake, part of which can be seen beyond the forested area in the center of the photo, below the eastern caldera wall.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1997 (Smithsonian Institution).
The easternmost of the two East Lake obsidian flows forms the sparsely vegetated area in the center of the photo near the SE shore of East Lake. This rhyolitic flow, another one to the west, and associated pumice deposits erupted from fissures parallel to the inner caldera wall.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1997 (Smithsonian Institution).
Three lava flows that erupted from fissure vents on the NW rift zone of Newberry volcano about 7,000 years ago can be seen in this photo. The Forest Road Flow in the foreground was one of the smallest. Behind it are the Lava Cast Forest and Lava Cascades flows. The latter traveled about 8 km from its vent. The northern rim of Newberry caldera forms the ridge on the horizon.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1997 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Lava Cascade lava flow erupted from the Newberry NW rift zone about 7,000 years ago and traveled about 8 km NW from its vent. The forested area to the far right is one of three large kipukas composed of older lavas that were surrounded by the flow. The flow in the foreground, called the Lava Cast Forest flow, originated from another fissure at about the same time. The NW rim of Newberry caldera rises in the distance.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1977 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Lava Cast Forest Flow was one of several lava flows erupted from the upper NW rift zone of Newberry volcano about 7,000 years ago. The flow is named for its abundant casts of trees that formed when lava chilled and cooled around standing or fallen tree trunks.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1997 (Smithsonian Institution).
The small Forest Road lava flow that was erupted from fissures on the central NW rift zone of Newberry. This lava flow, one of the smallest from the NW rift zone of Newberry volcano, originated from a fissure vent immediately NW of the Lava Cast Forest flow.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1997 (Smithsonian Institution).
Newberry caldera is one of the largest volcanoes in the conterminous United States, covering an area of about 3,200 km2. Two lakes, Paulina Lake (top) and East Lake (bottom) partially fill the 6.5 x 8 km wide caldera, which formed following the eruption of major pyroclastic flows during the Pleistocene. Subsequent eruptions have taken place from vents within the caldera, near its rim, and from fissures on its flanks. The light-colored lobate lava flow south (left) of Paulina Lake is one of several obsidian flows erupted during the Holocene.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 1998 (Smithsonian Institution).
The Big Obsidian Flow covers 2.6 km2 of the floor of Newberry caldera and was emplaced about 1,300 years ago. The eruption began from a vent at the base of the southern caldera wall with a large pumice fall deposit followed by a pyroclastic flow that entered Paulina Lake, and finally with emplacement of the obsidian flow. East Lake lies in the background in this view from the southern caldera rim.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2002 (Smithsonian Institution).
Newberry volcano, one of the largest Quaternary volcanoes in the conterminous United States, lies 60 km E of the crest of the Cascade Range in central Oregon. The shield volcano contains a 5 x 7 km caldera with two lakes, Paulina Lake (left) and East Lake (right). Newberry has been active during the Holocene at vents within the caldera that have produced pumice cones and obsidian lava flows (like Obsidian flow to the lower right), and outside the caldera forming scoria cones on its broad flanks.

Photo by Lee Siebert, 2002 (Smithsonian Institution).
GVP Map Holdings

The maps shown below have been scanned from the GVP map archives and include the volcano on this page. Clicking on the small images will load the full 300 dpi map. Very small-scale maps (such as world maps) are not included. The maps database originated over 30 years ago, but was only recently updated and connected to our main database. We welcome users to tell us if they see incorrect information or other problems with the maps; please use the Contact GVP link at the bottom of the page to send us email.


Title: Canada, United States
Publisher: DMA Aerospace Center
Country: United States
Year: 1988
Series: ONC
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Canada, United States

Title: W US /Map of Dist, Comp, Age-Late CZ Volc Centers
Publisher: US Geological Survey
Country: United States
Year: 1984
Series: MI
Map Type: Geology (Volcano)
Scale: 1:2,500,000
Map of W US /Map of Dist, Comp, Age-Late CZ Volc Centers

Title: Dist, Thickness, Mass of Tephra from Volcanoes
Publisher: US Geological Survey
Country: United States
Year: 1983
Series: MFS
Map Type: Geology (Volcanic Hazard)
Scale: 1:2,500,000
Map of Dist, Thickness, Mass of Tephra from Volcanoes

Title: Distribution, Comp, & Age of L Cen Volcan, Cascade Range, NW US
Publisher: US Geological Survey
Country: United States
Year: 1983
Series: MI
Map Type: Geology
Scale: 1:500,000
Map of Distribution, Comp, & Age of L Cen Volcan, Cascade Range, NW US

Title: Map SHowing Distribution, Composition, and Age of Late Cenozoic Volcanic Centers in Oregon and Washington
Publisher: US Geological Survey
Country: United States
Year: 1982
Series: Misc Investigations
Map Type: Geology
Scale: 1:1,000,000
Map of Map SHowing Distribution, Composition, and Age of Late Cenozoic Volcanic Centers in Oregon and Washington

Title: Geothermal Energy Resources of the Western United States
Publisher: ERDA and USGS
Country: United States
Year: 1977
Map Type: Cultural (Geothermal Resources)
Scale: 1:1,250,000
Map of Geothermal Energy Resources of the Western United States

Title: Crescent
Publisher: US Geological Survey
Country: United States
Year: 1970
Series: V502
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:250,000
Map of Crescent

Title: Klamath Falls
Publisher: US Geological Survey
Country: United States
Year: 1970
Series: V502
Map Type: Topographic
Scale: 1:250,000
Map of Klamath Falls

Title: Geol Map of OR W of 121st Meridian
Publisher: US Geological Survey
Country: United States
Year: 1961
Series: MI
Map Type: Geology
Scale: 1:500,000
Map of Geol Map of OR W of 121st Meridian
Smithsonian Sample Collections Database

The following 30 samples associated with this volcano can be found in the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections, and may be availble for research (contact the Rock and Ore Collections Manager). Catalog number links will open a window with more information.

Catalog Number Sample Description Lava Source Collection Date
NMNH 117465-1 Obsidian -- --
NMNH 117465-10 Pumice Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-11 Obsidian Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-12 Obsidian Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-13 Obsidian Big Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-14 Obsidian Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-15 Obsidian Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-16 Volcanic Bomb Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-17 Pumice Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-18 Pumice Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-19 Pumice Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-2 Obsidian -- --
NMNH 117465-20 Obsidian -- --
NMNH 117465-21 Obsidian -- --
NMNH 117465-22 Obsidian -- --
NMNH 117465-23 Pumice -- --
NMNH 117465-24 Pumice -- --
NMNH 117465-25 Pumice Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-26 Pumice Lost Lake Obsidian Flow --
NMNH 117465-27 Glass -- --
NMNH 117465-28 Pumice -- --
NMNH 117465-29 Glass -- --
NMNH 117465-3 Pumice -- --
NMNH 117465-30 Pumice -- --
NMNH 117465-4 Pumice -- --
NMNH 117465-5 Pumice -- --
NMNH 117465-6 Pumice -- --
NMNH 117465-7 Pumice -- --
NMNH 117465-8 Obsidian -- --
NMNH 117465-9 Obsidian -- --
External Sites