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Theme Collections | International Space Station Photos

Theme collections are galleries not specifically related to volcanic hazards, processes, research, types, or features. This includes subjects such as different satellite platforms, astronaut photos from the Space Shuttle, specific photographers, or other special collections.


Image Gallery for International Space Station Photos

Astronaut photos from the International Space Station. There are 108 images available.

One of the largest historical eruptions in the Kuriles took place 11-16 June from Sarychev Peak. This NASA International Space Station view on 12 June shows an eruption plume that rose to 16-21 km altitude; pyroclastic flows reached the sea and extended the shoreline in some areas. The main explosive phase ended on 16 June, but weak explosions producing ash plumes continued prior to arrival of a field team on 26-28 July, when no eruptive activity was observed.

NASA International Space Station image ISS020-E-9048, 2009 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
An ash plume from Sheveluch was photographed by NASA astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) around 21 March 2007. Dome growth had recommenced in 1999 and resulted in ash plumes, avalanches, and occasional block-and-ash flows.

NASA International Space Station image ISS014-E-17165, 2007 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Tana volcanic complex in the center of this NASA International Space Station image forms the eastern half of Chuginadak Island, across from Cleveland visible to the upper left. A young cone and crater form the western summit.

NASA International Space Station image ISS001-E-5957, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Eruption of Cleveland on 23 May 2006 as photographed from the International Space Station at an orbital altitude of approximately 400 km. The photograph shows the ash plume moving SW from the summit with N at the top and Carlisle Island to the NW.

Courtesy of Jeffrey N. Williams, Flight Engineer and NASA Science Officer, International Space Station Expedition 13 Crew, NASA Earth Observatory.
Sergief volcano on SW Atka Island lies below and to the left of the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the lower right). The SW part of the Atka Island is older and less topographically rugged than the NE part of the island, and the age of this small stratovolcano is not precisely known. The large embayment at the right-center is Podsopochni Bay. Portage Lagoon and Sergief Bay at the upper right almost bisect the island.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-18300, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small snow-free crater at the upper right, above and to the right of the light-colored area just right of the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper left) is Trocon volcano. Trocon lies in Argentina NE of the Caldera del Agrio (lower right), whose floor contains several lakes, including the U-shaped one at lower right near the SE caldera wall. Trocon is a lava-dome complex with two summit craters and a pyroclastic cone. Snow-covered Callaqui volcano (bottom left-center) overlies the western rim of Caldera del Agrio.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-39998, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
This International Space Station image from 2002 with N to the top shows the 6 x 8.5 km Segara Anak caldera. The Barujari cone in the center has produced lava flows that have entered the lake. The summit of Rinjani (right) contains a crater that postdates caldera formation.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-15296, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small light-brown area at the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the bottom right) is Volcán Lomas Blancas. This small shield-like 2268-m-high stratovolcano of late-Pleistocene to Holocene age is located about 15 km SE of snow-capped Nevado de Longaví volcano (right-center). A 2.3-km-wide caldera, possibly formed by edifice collapse, can been seen opening to the SE. Pumice deposits probably originating from Nevado de Longaví blanket the volcano. The crescent-shaped lake at the upper left is Laguna del Dial.

NASA International Space Station image ISS008-E-7432, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The crescent-shaped lake at the top-center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the bottom right) is Laguna del Dial. A cinder cone named Volcán Resago, on the SE side of the lake, produced a basaltic-andesite lava flow that traveled about 3 km to the WNW into Laguna Dial. The youthful cone may have been formed during an undocumented eruption during historical time. The lake at the lower left is Laguna Valvarco.

NASA International Space Station image ISS008-E-7432, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small volcanic center with the crater outlined by snow just to the left of the bottom center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper right) is Cerro Pantoja. This eroded basaltic-andesite volcano of Pleistocene age along the Chile-Argentina border has a Holocene cinder cone on the Argentinian side. The deep blue lake at right-center is Lago Constancia, and the large stratovolcano with a snow-filled summit crater at the top of the image is Puyehue.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-40413, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Conical Maipo volcano rises above the floor of Diamante caldera in this NASA International Space Station view (with north to the top). A series of flank vents on the eastern side of the volcano produced lava flows that give the western shoreline of Laguna Maipo and irregular outline; a lava flow in 1826 blocked drainages on the caldera floor, forming the lake. The 15 x 20 km Diamante caldera was formed during a major explosion eruption about 450,000 years ago.

NASA International Space Station image ISS009-E-7182, 2004 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
A complex of snow-covered cones (left-center) partially fills the 30 x 45 km wide Caldera del Atuel, which lies just east of the Argentina-Chile border. The headwaters of the Río del Atuel drain to the SE through a wide breach in the caldera rim (top center) in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the bottom left). The snow-covered Volcán Overo and Sosneado complexes in the eastern part of the caldera contain numerous very youthful basaltic-to-andesitic pyroclastic cones and lava flows.

NASA International Space Station image ISS010-E-19060, 2005 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
This dramatic NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper right) is of Socompa volcano. A large horseshoe-shaped caldera breached to the NW was the source of a major debris avalanche about 7,000 years ago that extended beyond the upper left margin of the image. Young dacitic lava domes and flows partially fill the collapse amphitheater, and prominent lava flows with flow levees are visible on the outer flanks.

NASA International Space Station image ISS003-E-5375, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The snow-mantled surface of Llullaillaco volcano is seen in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper left). The two youthful looking lava flows with prominent flow levees descending the northern and western flanks of the volcano appeared to be of Holocene, but Ar/Ar dating showed them to be of late-Pleistocene age. Llullaillaco is the world's highest historically active volcano.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-13814, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The world's highest historically active volcano, Llullaillaco, sits astride the Chile-Argentina border in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper right). A well-preserved summit cone was the source of prominent lava flows that are older than they appear in this image. The hilly terrain at the lower right was produced by a major debris avalanche about 150,000 years ago that swept eastward into Argentina and diverges around the north and south sides of the older Cerro Rosado stratovolcano (extreme lower right).

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-13814, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Cerro del León (center) is an andesitic stratovolcano flanked by two massive dacitic lava domes, Chillahuita to the SE (the circular dome to the lower right) and Chao to the NW. Chao forms the massive box-shaped dome and lava flow at the top center in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper left) and is the world's largest of its type. The 14.5-km-long dacitic lava flow has distal margins that are 350-400 m high and formed in several eruptive pulses.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-8788, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The large dark-colored area above orange-colored Laguna Colorada in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper left) is Volcán de Jorcada. This elongated fissure-controlled volcanic massif contains more than 50 craters, small stratovolcanoes, and lava domes erupted along four fissures covering an area of 230 km2. Activity has migrated to the north, and the youngest fissure, on the NW side of the complex, produced a number of snow-dusted cones visible left of the center of this image.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-8788, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The large volcanic complex at the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper right) is Cerro del Azufre. The volcano lies just west of the Bolivian border, south of Salar de Ascotán (the light-colored area at the upper right). A youthful lava dome forms a small circular area below and to the right of the center of the image, and the Holocene San Pedro-San Pablo volcanic complex lies at the left-center.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-8788, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
A chain of cinder cones was erupted along NE-SW-trending fissures at the head of Puyuhuapi fjord (top-center) in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper left). The Volcanes de Puyuhuapi consists of a larger group of four cones on the western side of Puyuhuapi fjord and a chain of smaller cones north of the head of the fjord. The two fractures and the fjord are related to the regional Liquiñe-Ofqui fault zone. The town of Puyuhuapi lies on the western side of the fjord, about halfway down its visible length in this image.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-7079, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The snow-covered area at the upper left in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the lower right) is the Volcán Domuyo volcanic complex. This 4709-m-high Argentinian volcano contains at least 14 dacitic lava domes and other eruptive centers within a 16-km-wide caldera, and at least another 5 lie outside the caldera. Elongated Laguna Valvarco at the lower right lies along the western margin of the Pleistocene Valvarco caldera.

NASA International Space Station image ISS008-E-7432, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The linear grayish lava flow extending into two lakes at the center originated from the Achín-Niellu cinder cone in the snow-covered area at the bottom-center of this NASA Space Station image with north to the upper left. The distal end of 7.5-km-long flow forms a large delta into Lago Epulafquen. A cinder cone separates this lake (known in the Machupe language as "Two Lakes") from the large lake at the upper right, Lago Huechulafquen. The lake at the right-center is Lago Curruhué.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-7197, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Clouds almost entirely obscure the small island of Kao (lower-center) in this NASA International Space Station image, and a circular cloud pattern rises above the caldera rim of the larger island of Tofua (left-center). No historical eruptions are known from Kao, and fresh-appearing lava flows are not seen, although the absence of sufficient time for erosion to produce deep gullies or high sea cliffs suggests a very recent origin.

NASA International Space Station image ISS008-E-14026, 2004 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The dark-colored circular area above and to the right of the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the top) is Tendürek Dagi. This shield volcano rises 1,800 m above the plain of Dogubayazit, near the Iranian border, NE of Lake Van (whose NE tip is at the lower left) and S of Mount Ararat (out of view to the upper right). An eruption took place from a vent on the SE flank of Tendürek Dagi about 2,500 years ago, and another eruption occurred in 1855.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-E-7778, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Three large calderas are seen in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper left) of the Vulsini volcanic complex in central Italy. The 16-km-wide Lake Bolsena (left-center) was formed during major Pleistocene explosive eruptions at about 300,000 years ago and the 8 x 11 km wide Latera caldera (below and to the left of Bolsena) about 160,000 years ago. Post-caldera volcanism produced scoria cones and lava flows (lower left) until recent times. Pleistocene Lake Vico in the Cimini Mountains lies at the right-center.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-36701, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small Amiata lava dome complex (just right of the center of this image), is located about 20 km NW of Lake Bolsena (left-center) in the southern Tuscany region of Italy. The largest of the domes is Monte Amiata (La Vetta). No eruptive activity has occurred during the Holocene, but thermal activity continues at a producing geothermal field.

NASA International Space Station image ISS008-E-7007, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small circular, forested volcano at the center of this NASA International Space Station image (N is to the top right) is Pulosari. The stratovolcano has a nearly 300-m-deep summit crater with fumaroles along its walls. The volcano lies SE of the 15-km-wide Pleistocene Danau caldera, whose northern and eastern rims and light-colored floor are visible at the upper right.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-10353, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Karang is the large, circular, forested volcano below and to the left of the center of this NASA International Space Station image (N is to the upper right) is. It is located to the SE of the 15-km-wide Pleistocene Danau caldera visible above the center of the image. There are two craters on the SE flank of Karang volcano, the highest peak in this volcanic region at the western tip of Java.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-10353, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
A group of isolated cinder cones lies near the Pacific Coast of Kamchatka at the lower right portion of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper right). The age of the cones ranges from mid-Pleistocene to perhaps early Holocene. Large stratovolcanoes of the Kliuchevskoi group are visible at the upper left and include Zimina (far left), the twin sharp-topped peaks of Kamen and Kliuchevskoi, and above them the Ushkovsky massif. The two volcanoes at the upper right are Zarechny and Kharchinsky, of Pleistocene age.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-13794, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The steep-walled, lake-filled summit caldera of Cosigüina volcano is prominent in this NASA International Space Station image with north to the upper left. Bahia el Rosario lies to the right of the elongate peninsula at the upper left with Punta San Jose at its tip, and the town of Potosi is at the top center. The scarp of an older caldera rim forms Filete Cresta Montosa, the semi-arcuate ridge below the summit caldera. This scarp continues in a more subdued form to the northern side of the volcano.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-51438, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Fresh-looking, dark-colored lava flows from the 1905 eruption of Momotombo volcano are prominent in this NASA International Space Station image with north to the top. The NW-most flow cascaded into Monte Galán caldera, with the greenish Laguna Monte Galán near its southern rim. Laguna Las Piedras lies near the center of the caldera, near the toe of the NW lava flow. The light-colored developed area south of the summit along the shore of Lake Managua is the Momotombo geothermal field.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-16247, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Maderas volcano, seen in this NASA International Space Station image with north to the upper right, forms the southeastern part of the dumbbell-shaped island of Ometepe. The roughly conical stratovolcano is cut by numerous faults and grabens, the largest of which is oriented NW-SE. The small Laguna de Maderas lake occupying summit crater is visible left of the center of this image. The satellitic Gorda pyroclastic cone forms the narrow peninsula at the right.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-17746, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The early Pleistocene Bolshaya Ipelka volcano has been extensively eroded by glaciers and has a single unnamed Holocene scoria cone on the southern flank. The conical stratovolcano to the E (right) is Opala, which was constructed along the northern rim of a large 12 x 14 km wide caldera.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-11691, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small snow-covered cone in the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with N to the top) is Golaya. This small, Pleistocene-to-Holocene cone lies SW of Asacha (top-right). The summit is elongated in a N-S direction and overlooks small cones to the W that formed during basaltic volcanism.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-36667, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
A large group of small cones is in the bottom-center of this NASA International Space Station image (with N to the top). Otdelniy, Tundroviy and other adjacent unnamed features are surrounded by a large group of late-Pleistocene to Holocene cones SE of Opala (the conical volcano to the upper left) and SW of Asacha volcano to the right.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-36667, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small, low-angle, snow-free volcano near the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with N to the right) is Ozernoy volcano. This early Holocene cone is dwarfed by the Ksudach caldera to the SE (lower left).

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-19216, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Ksudach is the volcano with multiple crater lakes at the bottom of this NASA International Space Station image (with N to the right). The smaller snow-covered cone near the left-center is the 700-m-high Holocene Belenkaya volcano.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-19216, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
An ash plume extends across the length of Paramushir Island in the northern Kuriles on 26 April 2003 in this NASA International Space Station image (with N to the left). An explosive eruption of Chikurachki began on 18 April, producing ash plumes up to about 2 km above the crater. On 1 May ash fell on the town of Severo-Kurilsk (~60 km from the volcano), and intermittent activity continued until early July. Alaid volcano is at the far left.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-52695, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small late Pleistocene or early Holocene cones of Golets and Tornyi are located just to the east (right) of the low-lying floor of the Vetrovoi Isthmus Caldera in northern Iturup Island. At the lower right in this NASA International Space Station image (N is to the top-right) right is Moyorodake volcano, and the Pleistocene Tsirk caldera is to the left of that.

NASA International Space Station image ISS010-E-13393, 2005 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Winter snows highlight morphological features of Damavand volcano in this NASA International Space Station image (N to the upper left). Lava flows with prominent levees can be seen at the bottom of the image and a small well-preserved crater can be seen at the summit. The volcano is located about 80 km NE of the capital city of Tehran.

NASA International Space Station image ISS010-E-13393, 2005 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
A long E-W-trending volcanic chain extends across the border between Chile and Bolivia in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper right). The chain extends from historically active Isluga volcano (upper left) to eroded Saxani volcano at the lower right. The smaller volcano immediately to the west of Saxani with a sharp shadow is the steep-sided Tata Sabaya volcano. Tata Sabaya was the source of a major debris-avalanche deposit (bottom center) that forms the small dark-colored hills on the white floor of Salar de Coipasa.

NASA International Space Station image ISS009-E-6849, 2004 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Snow capped volcanoes dot this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper right) taken along the Chile-Bolivia border. The snow-capped peak at the far left-center is Guallatiri volcano, and to its right are the three peaks of Nevados Quimsachata, which includes Acotango volcano. The two peaks at the upper left are Pomerape and Parinacota, with Laguna Chungara below. Nevado del Sajama in Bolivia lies at the upper right-center. At the lower right is the snow-free volcano of Macizo de Larancagua.

NASA International Space Station image ISS009-E-6848, 2004 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The eroded volcanic massif above and to the right of the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper right) is the Nevado Anallajsi volcanic complex. The basaltic-to-dacitic volcano has been extensively dissected by glaciers. Younger basaltic lava flows were erupted from a north-flank vent, but the age of this activity is uncertain. The large volcano at the bottom center is Sajama volcano, also in Bolivia, and the twin snow-capped peaks at the far left-center are Pomerape and Parinacota volcanoes along the Chilean border.

NASA International Space Station image ISS009-E-6848, 2004 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The snow-speckled volcanic complex near the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the lower right) is the Patilla Pata complex. The age of this volcano is uncertain, and Holocene activity has not been confirmed. This extensively eroded andesitic and basaltic volcano lies along a graben extending NE from glacier-covered Pomerape volcano at the upper right, which is part of the Nevados de Payachata complex that includes Parinacota volcano.

NASA International Space Station image ISS009-E-6839, 2004 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The two snow-capped volcanoes of the Nevados de Payachata volcanic group dominate this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the bottom). A prominent summit crater tops symmetrical Parinacota volcano, constructed to the SW of its eroded Pleistocene twin, Pomerape volcano. Silicic lava flows from Parinacota form lobes extending into Laguna Chungará, which was formed when a major debris avalanche from Parinacota blocked drainages. The hummocky debris-avalanche deposit covers much of the lower right part of the image.

NASA International Space Station image ISS009-E-6837, 2004 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Harra of Bal Haf volcanic field fills much of this NASA International Space Station image taken along the Gulf of Aden in southern Yemen (N to the bottom left). Dark-colored lava fields cover much of the volcanic field and create an irregular shoreline. One basaltic flow may be of historical age. Two large tuff cones are visible along the coast at the upper left, one of which is lake filled.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-5153, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Ile de la Possession, located immediately west of Ile de l'Est in the Crozet archipelago, is seen in this NASA International Space Station image (N at the top). The 14 x 19 km island is structurally complex and has an irregular shoreline. It consists of a stratovolcano intruded by ring and cone dikes and modified by block faulting, marine erosion, and uplift. Young scoria cones of probable Holocene age are distributed over much of the island.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-37990, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Ile de l'Est, the easternmost island in the Crozet archipelago, is seen in this NASA International Space Station image (N to the top). The glacially-eroded volcano contains about a half dozen young scoria cones of possible Holocene age concentrated on its E flank. Cape Itaine forms the small peninsula on the SW side of the island (bottom left), and Abondance Bay is at the bottom center.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-37992, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Clouds drape oval-shaped, 17-km-wide Aneityum Island in this NASA International Space Station image with north to the top. Aneityum, also known as Anatom, consists of two coalescing, dominantly basaltic Pleistocene volcanoes. Both the NW side of Inrerow Atamwan volcano (left) and the SE side of Nanawarez volcano (right) are truncated by large erosional cirques. Volcanic activity ceased during the late-Pleistocene to Holocene. Fringing reefs are visible on the northern side of the island.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-5732, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The southern two-thirds of Vanua Lava Island is seen in this NASA International Space Station image. Suretamatai volcano forms much of the island, with the most recent activity occurring in the northern part of the island near the area with small clouds at the top of the image. The Pleistocene Ngéré Kwon volcano forms the peninsula at the bottom of the image, and small offshore islands to the right are uplifted reef limestones. Activity that began during the 19th century has consisted of moderate explosive eruptions.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-40035, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The elongated island of Motlav, also referred to as Mota Lava, lies in the northern Banks Islands of Vanuatu. The 12-km-long island is comprised of at least five Pleistocene basaltic stratovolcanoes capped by two well-preserved late-Pleistocene to Holocene pyroclastic cones, Tuntag and Vetnam. The low peak with a shadow above it at the lower left (SW) part of the island is Tuntog, a largely pyroclastic composite cone with a 500-m-wide summit crater. Vetnam pyroclastic cone lies in the center of the island.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-26739, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Crescent-shaped Lake Letas partially fills the summit caldera of Gaua volcano, curving around the historically active post-caldera Mount Garat. Several young lava flows from flank vents reached the coast and form the smoother areas along the flanks of the volcano. The 6 x 9 km caldera is bound by a series of discontinuous, bifurcating faults. The dissected terrain on the SW (lower left) is part of an older series of tuff cones and lavas.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-40036, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Tore volcano is in the Emperor Range on NW Bougainville Island. The Tore massif lies to the left of Balbi volcano, which is the light-colored area at the center of the image. Two Pleistocene ignimbrites from Tore formed a broad fan that extends the coastline to the W (lower left). The dark-colored caldera lake of Billy Mitchell volcano is at the right, above a plume originating from Bagana volcano. N is to the upper left of this NASA image.

NASA International Space Station image ISS001-358-32, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Pliocene-to-Quaternary Gallego volcanics cover a large area of NW Guadalcanal Island along the top part of this NASA International Space Station image (N is to the upper right). Local traditions mention a historical eruption from Mount Roundhead, but this could refer to an eruption from Savo volcano, the island to the upper right. Mount Esperance volcano rises above Cape Esperance, across the channel from Savo Island. The city of Honiara lies along the northern coast of Guadalcanal Island at the lower right.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-727A-10, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Glacier-clad Mount Ararat, seen in this NASA International Space Station image, is Turkey's highest, largest volume, and easternmost volcano. Kucuk Ararat (or Lesser Ararat) lies across a saddle to the SE (right-center). Prominent lava flows with flow levees were erupted from flank vents between Greater and Lesser Ararat; one of these terminates in a fan-shaped lobe at the lower left. Pyroclastic-flow deposits from Ararat overlie early Bronze Age artifacts.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-E-10032, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Small cones and lava domes dot the surface of snow-covered Ghegam Ridge (upper left), located west of Lake Sevan (right) in west-central Armenia. North lies to the upper right in this NASA International Space Station image. The volcanoes and associated lava flows cover a 65-km-long, 35-km-wide area west of Lake Sevan and are concentrated along three NNW-SSE-trending alignments. Lava flows from the central and eastern clusters flowed into Lake Sevan at the upper left-hand side of the lake.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-42481, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Vella Lavella Island (left center) lies in the New Georgia Islands in the Solomon Islands chain. North is to the upper left in this NASA International Space Station image. Nonda volcano, the youngest volcanic feature of Vella Lavella Island, is a lava dome located within a crater to the N. The Paraso thermal area is the (light-colored area at center) contains solfataras, hot springs, and boiling mud pots. Kolombangara Island is at the upper right.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-727A-2, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The island of Yali (upper left) and the island of Nisyros Island (lower right) are shown this NASA International Space Station image (with N to the upper left). Yali contains two distinct segments connected by a narrow isthmus formed of modern reef sediments and consists of rhyolitic obsidian domes at the NE end and pumice-fall deposits at the SW end. A caldera 3-4 km wide, much of the W side of which is filled by post-collapse lava domes, is visible on Nisyros Island.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-30975, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
A narrow gap in the NNE rim of 7.5-km-wide Pleistocene Brouton caldera on Uratman volcano in the Kuril Islands has led to the formation of the bay. The caldera floor lies 250 m beneath the sea surface, and the rim rises 450 m above that. The central Uratman cone grew to a height of about 680 m during the Holocene.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-6514, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
A lone cloud rises above Ilikedeka volcano near the center of this NASA International Space Station image of the NE end of Flores island. The Riang Kotang fumarole field consists of two fumarolic areas located at the northern foot of Quaternary Ilikedeka volcano, along the saddle between it and the volcanic massif at the top of the image. Hot springs are located along the SW side of Oka Bay (bottom) and Hadang Bay on the NW coast.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-17557, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Four volcanoes are seen in this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper left) of Solor (lower left), Adonara (upper left), and Lembata (right) Islands. Ililabalekan volcano on SW Lembata (formerly Lomblen) Island is the only one of these without historical eruptions, although fumaroles are found near its summit. A satellitic cone was constructed on the SE flank of the steep-sided volcano, and four craters, one of which contains a lava dome and two small explosion pits, occur at the summit of Mount Labalekan.

NASA International Space Station image ISS009-E-7480, 2004 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The summit of Nabukelevu lies between the two clouds near the center of this NASA International Space Station image and is located at the SW end of Kadavu Island at the southern end of the Fiji archipelago. Debris avalanches from collapse of the Mt. Washington lava dome complex reached both the northern coast to the right of Cape Washington (the small peninsula at the upper left) and horseshoe-shaped Daviqele Bay (bottom center) and the south. Block-and-ash flows from dome growth and collapse have occurred within the past few hundred years.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-7466, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Clouds partially obscure the 22 km2 Isla del Coco (Cocos Island) in this NASA International Space Station image. Chathan Bay (top) lies off the NE tip of the island, which sits astride the Cocos Ridge about 650 km SW of the Costa Rican port of Puntarenas. The rain-drenched island is renowned as the site of treasures buried by pirates and ship captains. Construction of a Pliocene-Pleistocene shield volcano was followed by caldera formation and the emplacement of a trachytic lava dome.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-7510, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Ice-covered Mount Burney occupies the NW part of the Muñoz Gomera Peninsula in the spectacular glaciated Patagonian fjord region of southern Chile. The volcano lies near the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the left). The rugged extensively glaciated topography surrounding the 1758-m-high Monte Burney is smoothed by volcaniclastic deposits from the volcano.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-41451, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The elongated, glacier-covered massif near the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the left) is Yanteles volcano in southern Chile. The volcano is composed of five glacier-capped peaks along an 8-km-long NE-trending ridge. Historical eruptions from this 2042-m-high, andesitic volcanic complex are uncertain.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-42998, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Glacier-clad Melimoyu is the prominent stratovolcano in this oblique NASA International Space Station image looking west toward the Corcovado Gulf. The volcano has an ice-filled 8-km-wide caldera that is drained by a glacier through a notch in the NE rim. The basaltic-andesite volcano is Pleistocene-Holocene in age.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-42370, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The roughly 20-km-wide Huequi Peninsula extends about 40 km into the Gulf of Ancud in southern Chile. Volcán Huequi is a small, glacier-free volcano located just to the right of the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper left). A parasitic cone is located on the west side of the 1318-m-high basaltic-andesite volcano, which has an 800-m-wide crater. Explosive eruptions were recorded during the 19th and 20th centuries, initially in 1890 and most recently in about 1920.

NASA International Space Station image ISS008-E-12502, 2004 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The forested volcanic complex in the lower center of this NASA Space Station image (with north to the left) is Hualique (also known as Apagado). This stratovolcano is located SW of snow-covered Yate volcano (top; left of center) and occupies the peninsula between the Gulf of Ancud and the Reloncaví estuary (upper left). A 6-km-wide caldera is open to the SW. Hornopirén volcano is the small rounded brownish peak below and to the right of Yate volcano.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-42995, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The major regional N-S-trending Liquiñe-Ofqui fault extends along the Estuario Reloncaví (lower right) through Ralún Bay (center) to Lake Cayutúe (just left of the top of the image). About 20 basaltic cinder cones, maars, and lava flows of the Cayutué-La Viguería volcanic field lie along this lineament. La Viguería and Volcán Cayutué are the principal cones. The former temporarily dammed the Río Petrohué, the meandering stream at the left.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-42993, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The glaciated Sierra Nevada volcano (center) is an andesitic to basaltic stratovolcano that lies about 15 km NE of Llaima volcano (far left). A snow-capped 7-km-long, E-W zone of fissure vents is visible above and to the left of Sierra Nevada near Laguna Conquillio, whose shores are partially constrained by lava flows from the two volcanoes. The age of Sierra Nevada has been considered to be late-Pleistocene or late-Pleistocene to Holocene.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-40420, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Quetrupillan stratovolcano is seen in this NASA International Space Station image with north to the upper right. The volcano was constructed within a large 7 x 10 km wide caldera. The 2360-m-high Quetrupillan volcano has produced more silicic lavas than its more prominent neighbors Villarrica and Lanín. Clusters of monogenetic vents, including lava domes and pyroclastic cones, are found on the southern side of the volcano.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-40424, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The glacier-clad Melimoyu stratovolcano dominates this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the lower left). The 8-km-wide, largely buried ice-filled caldera is drained by a glacier through a notch in the NE rim. The 2400-m-high basaltic-andesite volcano is of Pleistocene to possible Holocene age and has several cinder cones.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-42125, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small circular feature just above the center of this NASA International Space Station image (with north to the upper left) is Chaitén caldera. It is located 10 km NE of the town of Chaitén, the light-colored area along on the Gulf of Corcovado below and to the right of the caldera. This small, glacier-free, 3.5-km-wide caldera is of Pleistocene age, but has a rhyolitic Holocene lava dome.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-42131, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Glacier-covered Volcán Minchinmávida is elongated along a NE-SW direction. The volcano has a mostly obscured 3-km-wide caldera, and a youthful eruptive center is located on the ENE side of the complex. An eruption from Minchinmávida was reported in 1742. Darwin observed the volcano in activity in 1834 on his renowned voyage that took him to the Galápagos Islands.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-42260, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The dark-colored lava flows in this NASA International Space Station image (N to the left) lie at the south end of the Es Safa volcanic field. This basaltic field (also referred to as As Safa), lies SE of the capital city of Damascas (Dimashq) and contains at least 38 scoria cones. A lava lake was observed in the Es Safa volcanic area in the middle of the 19th century. This volcanic field lies within the northern part of the massive alkaline Harrat Ash Shaam volcanic field that extends from southern Syria to Saudi Arabia.

NASA International Space Station image ISS007-E-8414, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Snow remnants highlight dendritic drainages eroded into pyroclastic flow deposits on the flanks of Tao-Rusyr caldera on Onekotan Island in this NASA International Space Station image (with N to the left). The 7.5-km-wide caldera formed about 7,500 years ago during the eruption of 30-35 km3 of tephra, producing one of the largest Holocene eruptions of the Kuril Islands. Subsequently, Krenitzyn Peak was constructed in the NW part of the caldera, reaching a height well above the caldera rim.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-6518, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Two lake-filled calderas dominate the 11-km-wide Chiltepe Peninsula extending NE-ward into Lake Managua. Greenish Lake Apoyeque was the source of two major late-Pleistocene plinian pumice deposits, and dark-blue Lake Jiloa (Xiloa) produced the Jiloa Pumice about 6500 years ago. The two calderas cut the summit of the Chiltepe pyroclastic shield volcano. Nicaragua's capital city Managua, extending across much of the right side of the image, has been subjected to major tectonic earthquakes.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-5765, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The E-W-trending capital city of San Salvador extends across much of this International Space Station image (with north to the bottom) and encroaches on the flanks of San Salvador volcano. The steep-walled Boquerón crater is 1.5 km wide and lies within a late-Pleistocene caldera whose eastern wall is highlighted by the shadow left of Boquerón. The dark-colored area at the bottom right is a flank lava flow produced during the 1917 eruption of San Salvador volcano. The western tip of Lake Ilopango is visible at the left-center.

NASA International Space Station image ISS001-E-5903, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Cosigüina volcano forms the northern half of a 25-km-wide peninsula extending NW-ward into the Gulf of Fonseca. A 2-km-wide caldera, partially filled by a lake, truncates the summit of the volcano, and the scarp of a larger older caldera is visible to the NW. Pyroclastic flows from the catastrophic 1835 eruption, the largest in Nicaragua during historical time, reached the Gulf of Fonseca. The volcanic island of Meanguera in the El Salvador side of the Gulf of Fonseca is visible at the top left.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-9143, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Lake Yojoa volcanic field forms the entire northern shore of the 10 x 12 km lake, the largest in Honduras, in this International Space Station image with north to the upper left. Cretaceous limestones lie west of the lake, and Tertiary volcanic rocks to the east. Vents of the volcanic field, which extends to the top of the image, are concentrated along two NW- and NE-trending lines. The Lake Yojoa volcanic field has produced both tholeiitic and alkaline basaltic rocks.

NASA International Space Station image ISS001-350-18, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Lake-filled Coatepeque caldera is prominent in this International Space Station image with north to the lower left. A post-caldera lava dome forms an island at the SW side of the lake. The nested summit craters of Santa Ana volcano are visible below and to the right of Coatepeque, and the unvegetated cone of Izalco volcano is to the right of Santa Ana. Small stratovolcanoes of the Sierra de Apaneca form the forested ridge at the bottom right. The light-colored area at the left-center is the city of Santa Ana, the second largest in El Salvador.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-9398, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Acajutla Peninsula is the largest topographic irregularity along a 900-km-long stretch of the Pacific coast between the Gulf of Tehuantepec off Oaxaca, México and the Gulf of Fonseca at the SE tip of El Salvador. The 20-km-wide peninsula was created by a debris avalanche that traveled nearly 50 km following the late-Pleistocene collapse of Santa Ana volcano, located beneath the cloud bank to the right of Coatepeque lake. Part of the shallow submarine component of the deposit is visible in this International Space Station image with north to the lower left.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-701-34, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Clouds drape the tops of the two islands of Ofu (left) and Olosega (right) in eastern Samoa in this International Space Station image (N is to the top left). The islands, 6 km in combined length, are separated by a narrow strait. They are formed by two eroded, coalescing basaltic shield volcanoes truncated by mostly-submarine calderas. A submarine eruption took place in 1866 about 3 km SE of Olosega, along the ridge connecting Olosega with Ta'u Island.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-E-6878, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The glacially eroded edifice in this center of this International Space Station image is the mid- to late-Pleistocene age Schmidt volcano (north is to the upper right). Holocene monogenetic scoria cones are on the E and NE flanks. Kronotsky is to the lower left and the Gamchen complex to the far right.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-13788, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The circular caldera at the center of this International Space Station image with N to the upper right is Pizrak caldera. The Holocene Kell volcano is visible within the caldera. This remote volcanic complex in southern Kamchatka contains three partially nested 3-5 km wide calderas containing lava domes and cones, of which Kell is the highest. The larger edifice to the lower left is Zheltovsky.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-11700, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small peninsula extending into the Sea of Okhotsk just above the center of the image is Mashkovtsev, the southernmost young volcano of Kamchatka. Cape Lopatka, the southern tip of Kamchatka, lies at the end of the narrow SW-pointing peninsula at the lower right in this International Space Station image with the Pacific Ocean at the bottom. Mashkovstev is a small basaltic stratovolcano that has a postglacial summit cone. Two small basaltic cones are located to the north.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-11698, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Vernadskii Ridge descends diagonally across this International Space Station image of northern Paramushir Island (with N to the upper right). The ridge is comprised of the Vernadskii (south) and Bogdanovich (north) volcano groups, consisting of small cones and lava domes. The historically active Ebeko volcano lies at the far upper right. The three large smooth-textured surfaces along the Pacific coast (to the right) are pre-glacial Pleistocene lava flows.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-611695, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Ischia volcanic complex forms a 6 x 9 km island W of the Bay of Naples seen in this International Space Station image. Tectonism has influenced volcanic activity at Ischia, and its high point (the dark-colored area in the center) is a horst (raised fault block) composed of ignimbrite deposits associated with Pleistocene caldera formation. During the Holocene, a series of pumiceous tephras, tuff rings, lava domes, and lava flows were erupted.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-E-8200, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Kuntomintar is a Pleistocene volcano that occupies the southern end of Shiashkotan Island in the central Kurils. A large crater on the west side opens toward the Sea of Okhotsk, with the scarp visible in this International Space Station image (with N to the upper left).

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-6515, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The cone of Prevo Peak in central Simushir Island is shown in this International Space Station image (with N to the lower left) with its 450 x 600 m summit crater and lava flows that reach both coasts of central Simushir Island. The flanks of the Pleistocene Ikanmikot volcano appear to the far right.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-6313, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Milne, the southernmost volcano on Simushir Island, lies immediately SE of Goriaschaia volcano (far left) in this International Space Station image (N is to the upper left). The walls of a 3-km-wide Pleistocene crater that opens towards the sea are visible in the lower half of the image. The small, mostly snow-free central cone near the crater headwall contains a lava dome that was constructed during postglacial time and forms the highest point on the island.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-6511, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
A barrier reef surrounds the Wallis Islands in this International Space Station view (N is to the left). Small explosion craters are visible on the 7 x 14 km Uvea Island. Uvea and the other low forested islands within the barrier reef are formed of flat-lying basaltic lava flows that are cut by explosion craters and capped by tuff cones and the scoria cones. Tuff cones and other features were considered to have been formed during the Pleistocene and Holocene based on morphology.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-E-9888, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The elongated, 32-km-long island of Tutuila in the center of the Samoan Islands is seen in this International Space Station view (with north to the upper right). Five Pliocene-to-Pleistocene volcanoes were constructed along rift zones, and the Pago shield volcano in the center of the island was truncated by an eroded, 9-km-wide caldera that incorporates Pago Pago harbor (right-center). Following a lengthy period of erosion, the Leone tuff cones and cinder cones were erupted during the Holocene across the southernmost portion of the island (left-center).

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-701-263, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Steep sea cliffs surround the 6 x 10 km Ta'u Island, located at the eastern end of the Samoan islands. The island is the exposed portion of the large Lata shield volcano. Collapse and landslide erosion of the southern portion of the shield volcano have left an arcuate, south-facing embayment (bottom) with a steep headwall. A tuff-cone complex is partially visible at the extreme NW tip of the island (top). The historic village of Fitiiuta lies at the NE tip of the island (far right).

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-E-9892, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Snow-capped Süphan Dagi volcano seen from the International Space Station, with north to the upper left. The flanks of the volcano contain numerous lava domes and cones that erupted along radial and circumferential fissures. The small black lake halfway between the snow line and Lake Van is the 1.5-km-wide Aygirgölü maar; the larger greenish Lake Arin is visible to the east.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-313-9, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
South Island (left center) is the southernmost and largest of the three volcanic islands in Lake Turkana. North is to the left in this International Space Station view. Lava flows erupted from a fissure extending the 11-km length of the island and form much of the eastern shoreline (top). An eruption from a scoria cone on South Island was witnessed during Count von Teliki's 1888 expedition.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-5095, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Anvil-shaped Raoul Island is the largest and northernmost of the Kermadec Islands. Two calderas are prominent in this International Space Station view with N to the upper right. The 2.5 x 3.5 km caldera cuts the center of the island, and the E wall of the partially submerged Denham Bay caldera rises above the smooth coastline at the left-center. The 6.5 x 4 km wide Denham Bay caldera formed during a major dacitic explosive eruption about 2,200 years ago, which truncated the W side of the island.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-E-8883, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The northern part of Saudi Arabia's largest lava field, 20,000 km2 Harrat Rahat, is seen in this NASA International Space Station image (N to the top left). Harrat Rahat extends for 300 km S of the city of Madinah (Medina), the light-colored area at the top-center. Although basaltic scoria cones are more common, small shield volcanoes and lava domes are also present. The most well-known eruption took place in 1256 CE, when the large dark-colored flow seen extending to the upper right traveled 23 km to within 4 km of Madinah.

NASA International Space Station image ISS001-344-27, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The summit of Nemrut Dagi is truncated by a 5 x 9 km caldera near Lake Van in eastern Turkey. A lake that partially fills the western side of the caldera is constrained by post-caldera eruptions that produced glassy obsidian lava flows from domes on the eastern caldera floor. A series of scoria cones and lava domes were erupted along N-S-trending fissures on the northern flank. Ash layers in Lake Van document numerous Holocene eruptions from Nemrut Dagi.

NASA International Space Station image ISS001-E-6354, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Alutu volcano lies between the light-brown Lake Mirrga (Lake Langano) to the S and green-blue Lake Zway to the N. Several craters are aligned along NNE-SSW and E-W fissures. Dark-colored obsidian lava flows erupted from craters along the fissures and descended the flanks in all directions. Although the age of the most recent eruption is not known, its eruptive products overlie recent basaltic lava flows to the W and strong fumarolic activity continues.

NASA International Space Station image ISS001-363-7, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The eastern (right) side of the darker Lake O'a (Lake Shalla) forms the 17-km-wide O'a caldera. Post-caldera activity produced cones N of the caldera. The small light blue-green Chitu maar on the W side of the lake was erupted in an area of Holocene vents along the Corbetti-Shalla fissure system extending N from Corbetti caldera. Fumarolic activity continues along the S and E shores.

NASA International Space Station image ISS001-363-7, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Kone volcanic complex, also known as Gariboldi, is composed of a series of silicic calderas and young basaltic scoria cones and lava flows. N is towards the lower left in this International Space Station image. The dark-colored basaltic lava flows on the caldera floor were erupted during the first half of the 19th century along a ridge between a smaller caldera to the E and a larger 5-km-wide caldera to the W. The larger young lava flow at the right was erupted from a vent on the SE flank.

NASA International Space Station image ISS001-363-9, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Rallier du Baty Peninsula (bottom left) forms the SW tip of Kerguelen Island. It contains two subglacial eruptive centers, Mont St. Allouarn and Mont Henri Rallier du Baty. An active fumarole field is related to a series of Holocene trachytic lava flows and lahars that extend beyond the icecap. The snow-covered peak at the mid-right is late-Pleistocene Mount Ross stratovolcano. The Kerguelen Islands are composed primarily of Tertiary flood basalts and a complex of plutonic rocks extensively modified by glaciation.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-21805, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Pleistocene and Holocene cinder cones and lava flows cover large portions of elongated Fuerteventura Island at the SE end of the Canary Islands. As seen in this International Space Station image, the youngest lavas form the darker colored areas at the northern tip of the island (including the small Lobos Island opposite the light-colored area on the NE tip of Fuerteventura) as well as in the south-central part of the arid island. Linear weather clouds extend from the SW tip of the island. No historical eruptions have occurred on Fuerteventura.

NASA International Space Station image ISS002-732-26, 2001 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Bazman (Kuh-e Bazman) volcano is located in remote SE Iran. A well-preserved, 500-m-wide crater caps the summit. Lava domes have been the source of viscous lava flows, including the prominent flow with visible flow levees at the lower left. No historical eruptions are known, but minor fumarolic activity has been reported.

NASA International Space Station image ISS006-E-5209, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Bayuda volcanic field is located near the center of the Bayuda desert of NE Sudan. The numerous small scoria cones that trend horizontally across the center of the volcanic field in this International Space Station image were erupted along a WNW-trending line. Lava flows, one of which was erupted about 1,100 years ago, are visible in this image, but about 10% of the vents are craters. Bayuda was constructed over Precambrian and Paleozoic granitic rocks, which form the darker areas at the lower right.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-711-20, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The Ardoukôba (Asal) Rift in the center of the photo lies in Djibouti and trends NW from the Red Sea. Ardoukoba contains a broad area of youthful fissure vents between Lake Asal (bounded by white saline deposits at the left) and the Ghoubbat al Kharab gulf (upper right). The most recent lava flows are younger than lake sediments deposited 5,300 years ago. The Ardoukôba fissure erupted in 1978, producing a small cinder cone and lava flows that covered part of the rift floor near the Red Sea.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-11422, 1992 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Biryuzovoe lake partially fills the youngest of three nested calderas of Zavaritzki volcano in central Simushir Island. The largest caldera is 10 km wide. The surface of the lake in the youngest 3-km-wide caldera is at about 40 m elevation and its bottom lies about 30 m below sea level. The small lava dome below the lower side of the lake in this International Space Station view (N is to the lower left) was emplaced during a 1957 eruption.

NASA International Space Station image ISS005-E-6512, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Santa María volcano, located south of the city Quetzaltenango, the second largest in Guatemala, is one of the country's most active volcanoes. Santiaguito lava dome was constructed within a large crater formed during the 1902 eruption of Santa María. The unvegetated lava flow above and to the right of Santa María was erupted from Cerro Quemado volcano, part of the Almolonga volcanic complex, which also includes the series of lava domes to the north of Cerro Quemado. The large forested depression at the left is cut into Siete Orejas volcano.

NASA International Space Station image ISS004-E-7999, 2002 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).